Jump to content
EUROPAS GROßE
SPORTWAGEN COMMUNITY
Sveni

Chris Harris über die Ferrari-Presse-Politik

Empfohlene Beiträge

Sveni
Erster Beitrag:
Letzter Beitrag:

http://jalopnik.com/#!5760248/how-ferrari-spins" data-cite="\"

http://jalopnik.com/#!5760248/how-ferrari-spins

">

How Ferrari spins -I told the blokes here at Jalopnik I was pissed at Ferrari and wanted to tell a few people. They said I could do it here. Stay with me, this might take a while.

I think it started in 2007 when I heard that Ferrari wanted to know which test track we were going to use for Autocar's 599 GTB road test, but in reality the rot had set in many years earlier. Why would it want to know that? "Because," said the man from the Autocar office, "The factory now has to send a test team to the circuit we chose so that they can optimize the car to get the best performance from it." They duly went to the track, tested for a day, crashed the car, went back to the factory to mend the car, returned, tested and then invited us to drive this "standard" 599. They must have been having a laugh.

Sad to say it, but the ecstasy of driving a new Ferrari is now almost always eradicated by the pain of dealing with the organization. Why am I bothering to tell you this? Because I'm pissed with the whole thing now. It's gotten out of control; to the point that it will soon be pointless believing anything you read about its cars through the usual channels, because the only way you get access is playing by its rules.

Like anyone with half a brain, I've been willing to cut Ferrari some slack because it is, well, Ferrari –- the most famous fast car brand of all and the maker of cars that everyone wants to know about. Bang out a video of yourself drifting a new Jag XKR on YouTube and 17 people watch it; do the same in a 430 Scuderia and the audience is 500,000 strong. As a journalist, those numbers make you willing to accommodate truck-loads of bullshit, but I've had enough now. I couldn't care if I never drive a new Ferrari again, if it means I never have to deal with the insane communication machine and continue lying about the lengths to which Ferrari will bend any rule to get what it wants. Which is just as well, because I don't think I'm going to be invited back to Maranello any time soon. Shame, the food's bloody marvelous.

How bad has it been? I honestly don't know where to start. Perhaps the 360 Modena press car that was two seconds faster to 100mph than the customer car we also tested. You allow some leeway for "factory fresh" machines, but this thing was ludicrously quick and sounded more like Schumacher's weekend wheels than a street car. Ferrari will never admit that its press cars are tuned, but has the gall to turn up at any of the big European magazines' end-of-year-shindig-tests with two cars. One for straight line work, the other for handling exercises. Because that's what happens when you buy a 458: they deliver two for just those eventualities. The whole thing stinks. In any other industry it wouldn't be allowed to happen. It's dishonest, but all the mags take it between the cheeks because they're too scared of not being invited to drive the next new Ferrari.

Remember the awesome 430 Scuderia? What a car that was, and still is. One English magazine went along with all the cheating-bullshit because the cars did seem to be representative of what a customer might get to drive, but then during the dyno session, the "standard" tires stuck themselves to the rollers.

How Ferrari spinsAnd this is the nub: how fucking paranoid do you have to be to put even stickier rubber on a Scuderia? It's like John Holmes having an extra two inches grafted onto his dick. I mean it's not as if, according to your own communication, you're not a clear market leader and maker of the best sports cars in the world now, is it?

What Ferrari plainly cannot see is that its strategy to win every test at any cost is completely counter-productive. First, it completely undermines the amazing work of its own engineers. What does it say about a 458 if the only way its maker is willing to loan it to a magazine is if a laptop can be plugged in after every journey and a dedicated team needs to spend several days at the chosen test track to set-up the car? It says they're completely nuts –- behavior that looks even worse when rival brands just hand over their car with nothing more than a polite suggestion that you should avoid crashing it too heavily, and then return a week later.

Point two: the internet is good for three things: free porn, Jalopnik and spreading information. Fifteen years ago, if your 355 wasn't as fast as the maker claimed you could give the supplying dealer a headache, whine at the local owners club and not much besides. Nowadays you spray your message around the globe and every bugger knows about it in minutes. So, when we used an owner's 430 Scud because Ferrari wouldn't lend us the test car, it was obliterated in a straight line by a GT2 and a Lambo LP 560-4, despite all the "official" road test figures suggesting it was faster than Halley's Comet. The forums went nuts and some Scud owners rightly felt they hadn't been delivered the car they'd read about in all the buff books. Talk about karma slapping you in the face.

It's the level of control that's so profoundly irritating and I think damaging to the brand. Once you know that it takes a full support crew and two 458s to supply those amazing stats, it then takes the shine off the car. The simple message from Ferrari is that unless you play exactly by the laws they lay down, you're off the list.

How Ferrari spinsWhat are those laws? Apart from the laughable track test stuff, as a journalist you are expressly forbidden from driving any current Ferrari road car without permission from the factory. So if I want to drive my mate's 458 tomorrow, I have to ask the factory. Will it allow me to drive the car? No: because it is of "unknown provenance," i.e. not tuned. I'm almost tempted to buy a 458, just for the joy of phoning Maranello every morning and asking if its OK if I take my kid to school.

Where I've personally run into trouble is by using owners' cars for comparison tests. Ferrari absolutely hates this; even if you say unremittingly nice things about its cars, it goes ape shit. But you want to see a 458 against a GT3 RS so I'm going to deliver that story and that video. Likewise the 599 GTO and the GT2 RS. Ferrari honestly believes it can control every aspect of the media — it has actively intervened several times when I've asked to borrow owners' cars.

The control freakery is getting worse: for the FF launch in March journalists have to say which outlets they are writing it for and those have to be approved by Maranello. Honestly, we're perilously close to having the words and verdicts vetted by the Ferrari press office before they're released, which of course has always been the way in some markets.

Should I give a shit about this stuff? Probably not. It's not like it's a life-and-death situation; supercars are pretty unserious tackle. But the best thing about car nuts is that they let you drive their cars, and Ferrari has absolutely no chance stopping people like me driving what they want to drive. Of course their attempts to stop me makes it an even better sport and merely hardens my resolve, but the sad thing is its cars are so good it doesn't need all this shite. I'll repeat that for the benefit of any vestige of a chance I might have of ever driving a Ferrari press car ever again (which is virtually none). "Its cars are so good it doesn't need this shite."

None of this will make any difference to Ferrari. I'm just an irrelevant Limey who doesn't really matter. But I've had enough of concealing what goes on, to the point that I no longer want to be a Ferrari owner, a de-facto member of its bullshit-control-edifice. I sold my 575 before Christmas. As pathetic protests go, you have to agree it's high quality.

Jesus, this is now sounding like a properly depressing rant. I'll leave it there. Just remember all this stuff then next time you read a magazine group test with a prancing stallion in it.

Ein sehr interessantes Thema, welches Chris Harris hier anspricht. Es ist sicherlich klar, dass Unternehmen ihre Produkte bestmöglich in repräsentativen Fachzeitschriften darstellen möchten. Dass dies jedoch soweit geht, verwundert mich nun doch etwas.

Jetzt registrieren, um Themenwerbung zu deaktivieren »
netburner
Geschrieben

Mich wundert da ehrlich gesagt nichts dran. Auch die anderen Hersteller haben speziell präparierte Pressetestwagen, allerdings geht es da dann nicht so weit, dass die vorher wissen wollen, wo genau man testet, damit der Wagen passend abgestimmt werden kann.

Das CPzine ist im Übrigen kurz nach der Gründung aus dem offiziellen Presseverteiler von Ferrari geflogen und nicht wieder aufgenommen worden. Grund? Den wüssten wir selbst gern, aber man hat ja gute Freunde, die einem die Pressemeldungen weiterleiten, damit die neuesten Ferraris dann hier erscheinen.

tollewurst
Geschrieben

Also für mich nichts neues, wenn man die Berichte mal vergleicht erkennt man doch immer wieder die Presse Bausteine von Ferrari. Ist doch absolut üblich. Also selber probefahren und eigenes Bild machen.

Atombender
Geschrieben

Grund? Den wüssten wir selbst gern, aber man hat ja gute Freunde, die einem die Pressemeldungen weiterleiten, damit die neuesten Ferraris dann hier erscheinen.

Muss an dem Ferrari FF Thread hier liegen :wink:

Die Objektivität eines Chris Harris würde ich mir bei so manch anderen "Testern" wünschen. Für mich der beste Autoreporter überhaupt.

Felix
Geschrieben

Chris Harris mochte ich als Auto-Journalist bisher immer sehr gut leiden...jetzt erst recht! ;) Das Hersteller stets besonders gut gehende Exemplare zu Tests schicken wissen wir ja längst. Das man allerdings Journalisten versucht zu unterbinden Kundenfahrzeuge zu fahren und zu vergleichen ist schon ne ganz andere Hausnummer. Harris ist mit der Aussage allerdings nicht nur Ferrari, sondern auch vielen anderen Unternehmen mächtig auf den Schlips getreten. Aber er hat schon recht, wenn er sagt das sich die Hersteller in Zeiten von Youtube und Internet-Foren solche Aktionen nicht mehr rausnehmen können. Daher gibt´s von mir für diese klaren Worte einen dicken :-))!

fiat5cento
Geschrieben

Macht doch jeder andere Hersteller genauso. Ferrari erzwingt/kontrolliert über seine Bekanntheit das Geschreibsel der Journalisten, andere kaufen halt genug Seiten an Werbung.

tollewurst
Geschrieben

Das nennt sich dann Druckkostenzuschuss :wink:

flat 12
Geschrieben

Die ganze Geschichte ist nicht wirklich neu - dafür aber genauso unschön wie früher.

Besonders einfach und dementsprechend oft werden "sehr" leistungsstarke Turbo oder Kompressor Fahrzeuge den Journalisten zur verfügung gestellt. Auffällig niedrig ist bei manchen Fahrzeugen das Gesamtgewicht, auch die Elektronik wird "angepasst" (z.b. Merc SLS Supertest -ABS-System) ... ist ja eigentlich bekannt.

Dass es immer kleinere Unterschiede zu den Serienfahrzeugen geben kann ist klar, da Test-Fahrzeuge teils nicht aus der Serienproduktion stammen.

hugoservatius
Geschrieben
Ferrari erzwingt/kontrolliert über seine Bekanntheit das Geschreibsel der Journalisten

"Geschreibsel" finde ich einen ziemlich despektierlichen Ausdruck, es gibt Leute, die schreiben von der "Cheffigkeit" eines A8 und es gibt Journalisten, die haben Literaturwissenschaften studiert und machen selbst aus dem Test eines Fiat 500 ein feuilletonistisches Meisterwerk - etwas mehr Respekt und Differenzierung bitte.

Rodemarc
Geschrieben

Das ganze ist interessant und jetzt kann auch ich als Laie mir vorstellen wie es bei solchen Tests abgeht.

Aber mir persönlich ist das eigentlich ziemlich Latte, denn wenn ich Magazine wie TopGear, Fifth Gear, Autocar anschaue oder Zeitschriften wie die SportAuto lese, interessieren mich die exakten Zahlen eigentlich relativ wenig.

Natürlich bekommt man dadurch einen Eindruck, aber ob der eine Wagen jetzt 3,5 Sekunden langsamer auf der Nordschleife ist, ist mir relativ unwichtig.

Wichtiger ist mir ein emotionaler Bericht (oder im TV eben schöne Bilder), der meinetwegen genau auf den Punkt bringt, dass ein Porsche Turbo genauso schnell ist wie ein Ferrari, dafür aber weniger emotional.

Das ist für mich zum großem Teil Entertainment und sollte deshalb nicht überbewertet werden.

Flatron
Geschrieben

Ich erinnere nur mal an den legendären ersten Mercedes SL55 AMG Test in der Ams wo der Wagen von 0 auf 300 km/h schneller war als ein Lambo Murcielago und 325 km/h an der Lichtschranke drauf hatte. Das war ja auch ein spezieller Pressewagen.

RABBIT911
Geschrieben

Das war der mit dem SLR Motor? Wenn ja, dann war es der Test bei dem man davor wusste, dass er nicht serie ist.

Flatron
Geschrieben

Ne soweit ich weiß nicht SLR Motor. Ich glaube ein SLR Motor würde schon aus Platztechnischen Gründen garnicht passen.

fiat5cento
Geschrieben
"Geschreibsel" finde ich einen ziemlich despektierlichen Ausdruck, es gibt Leute, die schreiben von der "Cheffigkeit" eines A8 und es gibt Journalisten, die haben Literaturwissenschaften studiert und machen selbst aus dem Test eines Fiat 500 ein feuilletonistisches Meisterwerk - etwas mehr Respekt und Differenzierung bitte.

Und was haben die beiden Gruppen von Leuten gemeinsam? Richtig, keine Ahnung von Autos.

"Geschreibsel" trifft es MEINER Meinung nach sehr gut.

PS.: Ich bin noch am überlegen ob dein Beitrag ironisch war... :confused:

EZB
Geschrieben

Ich kann auch nicht verstehen, wieso Ferrari so schummeln muß. Die Autos und ihre Fahrleistungen sind doch sehr überzeugend, und auf irgendwelche letzten 10tel-Sekunden kommt es doch nur beim Quartettspiel an. :???: Durch die Veröffentlichung dieser Praktiken ging der Schuß doch letztendlich nach hinten los.

hugoservatius
Geschrieben
Und was haben die beiden Gruppen von Leuten gemeinsam? Richtig, keine Ahnung von Autos.

"Geschreibsel" trifft es MEINER Meinung nach sehr gut.

PS.: Ich bin noch am überlegen ob dein Beitrag ironisch war... :confused:

Entweder liest Du nur AutoBild oder Du hast wirklich keine Ahnung.

Schon 'mal einen Text von Wolfgang Peters in der FAZ oder von David Staretz in der autorevue gelesen?

Oder von LJK Setright in der Car, von Robert Croucher in der Octane?

Ich weiß ja nicht, was Deine Profession ist, würde das was Du tust aber nie so verunglimpfen.

Und ironisch ist mein Beitrag sicher nicht gemeint gewesen.

Kopfschüttelnde Grüße, Hugo.

RABBIT911
Geschrieben
Ne soweit ich weiß nicht SLR Motor. Ich glaube ein SLR Motor würde schon aus Platztechnischen Gründen garnicht passen.

Wieso soll er da nicht reinpassen? :confused:

RABBIT911
Geschrieben

@fiat5cento - Gut gemacht... die Büchse der Pandora ist geöffnet. :-(((°

okuehlein
Geschrieben

Der SLR Motor passt locker in den SL Vorbau. Ist ja nur ein V8. In den SL Vorbau passt ja auch der V12....

In Dubai gibt es sogar einen E55 AMG mit SLR Motor und einen SLK 55 AMG mit SLR Motor.

Ich hab da Bilder gesehen und nicht schlecht gestaunt....

brobox
Geschrieben

Spezielle Pressefahrzeuge gab es wohl schon immer. Leider gibt es nicht mal Bemühungen seitens etablierter Tester, zumindest mal die Motorleistung nachzuprüfen. Anscheinend möchte keiner den kuscheligen Kontakt zu den Herstellern gefährden.

Jedoch geht der Versuch, die Beschaffung von wirklich serienmässigen Testfahrzeugen zu be- oder verhindern, eindeutig zu weit, das hat schon berlusconische Züge.

Chris Harris blamiert mit seinen Aussagen natürlich all jene Publikationen, die sich offensichtlich auf den Kuhhandel mit Ferrari widerspruchslos einlassen.

absolutmuc
Geschrieben
Ne soweit ich weiß nicht SLR Motor. Ich glaube ein SLR Motor würde schon aus Platztechnischen Gründen garnicht passen.

...also ohne SLR-spezifische Ansaugung und Auspuffanlage geht das Ding natürlich rein, ist auch nur ein 5,4-AMG-Kompressor mit verfeinerten Innereien.

post-83512-14435362064679_thumb.jpg

cinquevalvole
Geschrieben

Spezielle Pressefahrzeuge, jaja, kann schon sein.

Allerdings schuldet der Mann uns den Beweis einer technischen Abweichung (z.B. Hubraum, Kennfeld, Drehzahlbegrenzer, Schaltzeiten, muffler, Untersetzung, Fluxcapicator).

Kein einziges Bauteil legt er auf den Seziertisch.

Oder waren die Presscar-Motoren einfach nur selektiert und eingefahren?

brobox
Geschrieben

So wie die sich anstellen schuldet Ferrari eher den Beweis, dass die Kundenautos das gleiche können wie die Presseautos. Aber gerade das wird ja unterbunden.

cinquevalvole
Geschrieben
So wie die sich anstellen schuldet Ferrari eher den Beweis, dass die Kundenautos das gleiche können wie die Presseautos. Aber gerade das wird ja unterbunden.

Was hält Chris Harris und andere davon ab, das F458 presscar auf Capristos Prüfstand zu stellen?

Einige Kunden waren schon drauf und zeigten nominelle Leistung.

okuehlein
Geschrieben

@cinquevalvole na ja, sobald die Ferrari Presseabteilung mit dabei ist wird es sicherlich keine Möglichkeit geben das Fahrzeug mal auf irgendeinen Prüfstand zu stellen....Es sei denn er wurde von Ferrari persönlich geeicht....

Und wie die anderen schon sagen. Speziell präparierte Pressefahrzeuge gab es schon immer. Wenn man aber die Beschreibung von Herrn Harris liest wird da einiges mehr vorgenommen, damit das Fahrzeug unter allen Umständen gut aussieht.

Ich erinnere mich noch an einen Supertest des 575M Maranello mit dem Fiorano Paket (wenn es denn so hieß). Der erste, den man bekam war auf der NS langsamer als ein regulärer 575M. Als man Ferrari dies mitteilte bekam man einen neuen Testwagen der dann deutlich schneller war. Und auf der NS macht nicht nur der Motor die Musik wie wir wohl alle wissen.....

Schreibe eine Antwort

Du kannst jetzt einen Beitrag schreiben und dich dann später anmelden. Wenn du bereits einen Account hast, kannst du dich hier anmelden, um einen Beitrag zu schreiben.

Gast
Auf dieses Thema antworten...

×   Du hast formatierten Text eingefügt.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Dein Link wurde automatisch eingebettet.   Einbetten rückgängig machen und als Link darstellen

×   Dein vorhergehender Inhalt wurde wiederhergestellt.   Editor leeren

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Neu erstellen...