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Do you know the price of lambo in China?


ah64zzp

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it isn't easy to import stuff of that sort into china, their government is very strict on that sort of thing, there are no propper dealers, it doesn't surprise me that much. Because of the chinese government's policy of allowing S.E.Z's, there is a new rising capitalist class within china which has a taste for all things expensive and western. I saw a picture the other day of a guy driving around hong kong in a hummer. Tell me how much sense that makes?

especially since a locally built car can likely be had for the equivalent of 1,500 dollars (given a loaf of bread there costs the equivalent of 25 cents, but still), also, keep in mind that the yuan is not a globally traded currency, the markets determine the exchange between euro, dollar, pound, yen, rouble, etc, the chinese government just decides what a Yuan is worth, which inflates the price of everything imported by a gross margin.

It seems that thepolarfoxqx know a lot of China :) , not only the car like lambo,even some very cheap car can be sold at a very high price in China. For example : price of a vw new beatles in China is about 600,000

RMB ,about 72,000$! You see, all the cars are all sold at a very high price in China.Beside the reasons have mentioned , i think there're some other reasons : China has a very large population:more than 1200000000,so if every family which can afford a car all buy their cars ,can you imagine the traffic in China( not to mention the poor road condition there)?

most of china's population is rural and lives the way western europe did 200 years ago. Even their urban populations are still fairly far away from the impacts of the SEZ policy. There is a select few in the capitalist class that benefit from that and are extremely wealthy. Look around you, all the "Made in China" stamped everywhere, someone is getting rich off that. Cars made in china are still very cheap, they are trying to cultivate an automotive industry, but their cars are still very primitive. Everything imported is expensive, their trade and economic system is totally tailored around exports, which also leaves them in a very precarious place where oil is concerned, china has next to no domestic sources of oil, and must import nearly all of it, because of their economic setup, this is very very expensive for them, making cars even less practical. Also, keep in mind that in a communist country, you have almost no disposable income, the government employs you, provides you housing, medical care, most everything you need, and gives you an allowance for odds and ends, so saving up for a car is impossible unless you are one of their connected capitalists connected with free industry. China having cars in the sense the modern world does just isn't practical under their current arrangement.

i agree with you ,it is not practical to buy cars in china.but as a matter of fact ,in some big city in china ,just like shanghai and beijing , large proportion(nealy half) of the passenger cars in the city are personal car.maybe you can not imagine that in order to buy a car ,they will spend 4 or 5years' income ,but the increasing of the urban population in china just happened in recent years ,in the beginning of the 90s most of them ony expected to earn 600$ one year . that means many of the car owners in china have spend nealy 20 years to save up for a car .i can not understand them.

i am not in a english speaking country ,maybe there are a lot of mistakes in my words(i'm practicing my english :) ) ,i am sorry about that ,and hope you can understand my words.

i agree with you ,it is not practical to buy cars in china.but as a matter of fact ,in some big city in china ,just like shanghai and beijing , large proportion(nealy half) of the passenger cars in the city are personal car.maybe you can not imagine that in order to buy a car ,they will spend 4 or 5years' income ,but the increasing of the urban population in china just happened in recent years ,in the beginning of the 90s most of them ony expected to earn 600$ one year . that means many of the car owners in china have spend nealy 20 years to save up for a car .i can not understand them.

It's the same in Romania. An average working class family must spend its 5 to 10 years income to buy a new Romanian made car, and that's not a good and reliable one.

My father bought his second car after 20 years from its first. And that's because he won at a quiz show. He still has it's first... And my folks are teachers at high school... by the way.

All that just to say that there are different worlds out there.

But what's in China amazes me.

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Hallo ah64zzp,

 

schau doch mal hier zum Thema Zubehör für Lamborghini (Anzeige)? Eventuell gibt es dort etwas Passendes.

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No wonder in all them damn Jackie Chan movies you see all them eye-slants riding bicycles and cycle-buggies everywhere. Jesus.

*Politically Incorrect Alert* - Beep! Beep! Beep!

In a nation as crowded with humanity as China, if everyone had a car, there would be no space to breath. In the U.S. prices are high, but just remember, they ain't the worst. But everyone, no matter if they live in China or rural Indiana, should learn to walk or ride bikes more. I'm a big proponent of this.

There are 9 cars in my household, I live in a cold place, I support ethanol, but as for transportation without heat, forget it.

Henry ford made it so his workers could afford the model T, that's how it should be.

Put on that parka, and slide on the tire chains and your set - don't forget your heated water bottle.

Yes, but I tend to think old Henry was more shrewd than generous." I pay you, then you pay it back to me in exchange for one of my cheap ass contraptions that you guys slap together by the thousands everday. " At least it was good incentive for quality control. The next Model T down the line, just might be your own. O:-)

If I had worked the line, and seen just what the T wasn't made of, I think I might have saved my hard earned $950 for something else. :bored:

Bicycles don't work in snow.

The driver seat of the rover is a good place to be.

As for henry, he gave workers more than any other industrialist of his day, and like it or not, the model t was rugged, reliable, and affordable, it gave transportation to millions who otherwise could never have afforded it. It is empowering to have what those workers had, no one else did that. It was smart business wise, sure, but also a good thing to do. Henry was a lot of what made america such an industrial power, before cars transportation was spotty, the advent of a car that was affordable literally redefined america and put us on the map. I look forward to a day in the future when around the world, american cars are once again considdered the finest. It may not be too long.

Bicycles don't work in snow.

If you think that my friend, you haven't witnessed a true die hard. :wink:

With a little help from Germany ( motivational or otherwise ), and a bit of self regard, America just might reestablish it's game. It's closer now than it has been in years.

You gotta give the T it's props. Now what was this about again, a Lambo in China? O:-)

thepolarfoxqx,you mention the SEZ policy,could you explain it?

Well, since I'm here right now, I might as well explain it.

In a nutshell, SEZs' or Special Economic Zones as they are known in China, are a strategy adopted by them, as well as other Asian countries. The zones are areas that have been set aside for the exclusive use of export activities only, to encourage foreign business and trade in the home country by offering large tax concessions to them. Offering low cost manufacturing and making it very attractive to investors. This creates jobs, technical knowledge, and major tax revenues.

Make doing business with them as attractive as possible, as in cheap labor, and tax breaks, and pretty soon your manufacturing everyone's goods. Like Fox said, look at all of the things that read " Made in China ".

Like the motto of a local car dealer. " We're stackin' em' deep, and sellin' em' cheap. "

Fox can elaborate on this if he likes.

In china, the SEZ is especially special too. Because of the policies of the Chinese Communist Party, and their constitution, There is no private ownership of land, business, or any other property, there is no work for profit, and there is absolutely no foreign ownership of anything. In order to inflate their economy and open their vast labor market to the world, they created certain small zones called "Special Economic Zones", where limited amounts of capitalism is allowed. In these zones, chinese citizens (always politically well connected, almost always CCP (communist party) members are allowed to own businesses - targetted for export naturally. The government does take a share of the profit, much like a western capitalist taxation system, but otherwise, an entrepenuer can run a business for their own personal benefit. Furthermore, in these zones, foreigners are allowed to invest. A chinese citizen must own a majority of the company, it must be run by the chinese, but foreign investors may invest in the company and partner with them. This is how western companies run production in china. In these zones, since labor costs so little, the margin for profit is huge for the chinese capitalists, the business owners can become phenomenally wealthy.

Also though, in order to further help their economy, and following the communist model example set by the soviet union, the chinese do not allow their currency to be market traded (like the euro, dollar, pound, yen, rand, etc are), they just say one dollar equals X Yuan, which means that they can manipulate it so that one dollar is worth a lot of yuan, making it financially advantageous to export and VERY VERY VERY expensive to import. That makes foreign made goods very expensive in china and chinese goods very cheap on the world market. Unfortuneately, as the soviet union discovered, this policy creates a pseudo-inlfationary effect (you can't have inflation in a fixed economy), causing their economy to tank and eventually get really messed up. China's system is precarious at best right now, first because of the effects of opening a closed economy to the world (the inflation effect), and seccondly, the wealthy chinese capitalists will want their system to be more western, more capitalistic, more open market, and will demand more power for themselves in the system, whereas the old guard of the communist party wants to keep the communist system rigid and stick to their traditional ideals, the two cannot coexist peacefully forever, and eventually something will have to give one way or the other.

Also, there is a provision of the SEZ policy that says the gov't can take any privately owned venture at any time without justification. They could take all of the western production there in theory. It's in their interest not to I think, but just an interesting point.

Why thank you. :wink:

Okay, okay, enough intellectual ass kissing. What is this the friggin' Mensa club?

Anyway, if you're an average Chinese citizen, your best bet to ever have anything, especially a Lamborghini or a Hummer, is to stoway on a tanker and leave the country. If you can make it to a U.S. shore ( the land of milk and honey ) typically, they will let you stay. Good luck. :wink2:

They will let you stay?

Hmm, try again. Getting a green card isn't just as easy as finding a way here. You have to prove you're special in ways everyone else from your country, and our country, is not.

The sheer number of illegal aliens deported annually is pretty hard to imagine. Over the summer I spent with family in california, the maid got deported, I was at first shocked, only to find out that that's happened to all of the maids eventually.

And Mensa is actually a lot of drinking. Very smart people drinking away brain cells. There are a lot of socially inept people and quietly pompass fools involved in that. A lot of it is about doing things only the brilliant are capable of. I guess if you get into their interest groups and enjoy it, but I never had the time or interest. That, and people sort of judge you differently if they find out you're a member. They didn't impress me that much.

And China is buying up more american debt than any other single entity. Running here would only be a temporary fix, because they are on track to owning us.

A trade deficit gets a little more interesting when the largest thing you are exporting is jobs.

Why thank you. :wink:

Okay, okay, enough intellectual ass kissing. What is this the friggin' Mensa club?

Anyway, if you're an average Chinese citizen, your best bet to ever have anything, especially a Lamborghini or a Hummer, is to stoway on a tanker and leave the country. If you can make it to a U.S. shore ( the land of milk and honey ) typically, they will let you stay. Good luck. :wink2:

He answered my question,so i thanked him.

You also answererd my question,so i thank you too.

I try to be polite,but you think it's a kind of ass kissing, maybe it's the differece between our culture.

Yes,i am an average Chinese citizen,and i indeed want a lambo,but a lambo is not the only thing i pursuit.I don't think we live in the world only for a supercar. I can enjoy my life without it.

China used to be poor and weak, it is a developing country, there are only 55 years since it has been founded in 1949,it is inevitably that its social and political system are incomplete.,but in recent years ,it changed a lot.I have said nealy half of the passenger cars in big cities of China mainland,just like shanghai ,are personal cars.That means many Chinese families can afford a personal car.If the car sold here in the same price as in US or Euro,there will be more personal cars(including the supercar)in China.I don't think it is necessary to stoway on a tanker and leave my country.

Many things abouit China you have mentioned is out of date,some of them are even never existed. thepolarfoxqx mentioned that

there is no private ownership of land, business, or any other property, there is no work for profit, and there is absolutely no foreign ownership of anything,it's the condition about more than 20 years ago.

Now in China ,anybody can own his/her company,no matter you are a CCP member or not ,as long as you have enough money to run your business,and i've never heared that only CCP members are allowed to own businesses, in fact ,most of the entrepenuers are not CCP members.

The Chinese government focus a lot of their attention on opening the whole country up to the outside world,both the coastal cities and the country's interior areas. Foreign investor can invest in a joint venture with a Chinese partner,or establish a buseness independently anywhere in China(not only in special economic zones).The Chinese economic system become more and more similar to the western capitalist economic system,the only difference is it is operated by Chinese Communist Party.

Have you been to China ?It is really not so bad as you think.

There are so much Chinese students study in US universities,we Chinese try to know the US,but Americans know little about China.

I don't want to say any more ,it is just a forum about cars.

thanks for the information on china. my knowledge of china comes from american university courses on comparative politics and global culture. I had suspected ownership had opened up more in china, but even text books here will sarcastically mention that being a CCP member was a big advantage in starting a business, but today there is so much capitalist business growth in china, that has to have changed. Only 4% of chinese citizens are CCP members. China is moving forward very quickly right now. The average age of the national people's congress members is down to 52 i think, last congress it was 66, so there is a new generation of leadership in china. If you look at some of the coastal cities - they are as modern as most big western cities. The fact that Ah64zzp is a chinese citizen and is on the internet speaks volumes about the fact china is far more open than stereotypes would say. I think the communist government is becomming more open and less restrictive as it's stereotypical image would portray. China is america's largest competitor politcally, militarily, and economically. We might have the running headstart, but they are catching up. I have a number of freinds who are from china originally - or whose parrents are from there, none of them have any unpleasant words about china today, they all go back and visit, and look favorably on china, they aren't bitter or angry at the country. Some of my freind's families left china 20 years ago to pursue more oppurtunity here, but china was different then than it is now. I still believe America is the greatest land of oppurtunity and freedom ever to have come into existance, but we have no right to look down on anyone else. China is clearly an up and coming country. I think the biggest challenge for china will be oil. They have very few reserves of their own and the US has a monopoly on international oil.

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