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Dino 208/308 GT4-Bilderbuch

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F40org CO   
F40org

Ich möchte hier einfach mal ein paar Bilder vom letzten Bertone-Serienferrari einstellen. Vermutlich gibt es einige "verstaubte" Bilder in Eureren Archiven die gerne mal in neues Licht gerückt werden könnten.

Bzgl. Technik/Schwachstellen etc. gibt es schon einen Theard hier.

http://www.carpassion.com/ferrari-308-328-348/17713-schwachstellen-probleme-dino-308gt4.html

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Lamberko   
Lamberko

208 GT 4 Cabrio by Bertone (s/n 13956)

208gt4cabriobybertonesschrgstr.jpg

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PAVAROTTI   
PAVAROTTI
:wink: Immer noch schön....

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Lamberko   
Lamberko

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Lamberko   
Lamberko

308gt4 Le Mans

The 308 GT4 made a first appearence at the 24 hours of Le Mans in 1974. Prepared by Luigi Chinetti and entered by the famous NART team, the GT4 compteted in group 5. It shared some performance parts, like brakes from its bigger cousin, the 512 BB LM. Reasonnably well qualified with a 4.32 by drivers Harley Cluxton and Giancarlo Gagliardi, it did however not see the checkered flag, due to clutch problems. It was entered again in 1975, but some still unclear pre-race debate made NART retire all his four Ferrari's, including the GT4, before the start on saturday.

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(NART-Sticker)

NART. One of the most respected names in motorsports. Some of the most famous drivers in history spent at least some of their time driving for this classic team owned and organized by long-time Ferrari man, Luigi Chinetti who not only was the man responsible for importing Ferraris into America but as a friend of Enzo Ferrari convinced him to not make tools and instead make cars. If this weren't enough he also had many wins under his own belt including three at the great spectacle of Le Mans.

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This car, chassis number 08020, is the only factory 308 GT4 competition car. It was prepared by the factory as a group 5 car for Le Mans in 1974 but retired with clutch problems after four hours lying 38th.

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A former owner of the car, W. A. Schanbacher, had these comments about the car:

"As a car for use in club or exhibition racing, it is almost perfect, being well-balanced with no really evil habits. In hard cornering, the throttle can be used to induce easily-controlled under or over steer. The motor is stone reliable, turning to 8000 rmp so easily that I have to watch my self-imposed 7000 - 7500 rpm limit. The DS II lining and silicon brake fluid have provided tremendous, balanced, fade-free, easily modulated braking. The suspension is surprisingly supple with light, but positive, steering. Even on rough parts of the track, the car holds well and doesn't lose its balance. Its predictability is confidence building, and allows me (the all too occassional driver) to drive hard with only my own limitations to worry about!"

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S P E C I F I C A T I O N S

E N G I N E

Daytona pistons and rods; crankshaft and cylinders machined to increase tolerances. Heads ported and polished. 42mm carburettors, race profile cams, and special exhaust headers. Re-engineered oil sump baffling. Result 300bhp at 8200 rpm designed to last 24 hours.

C H A S S I S AND B O D Y

Brakes: Girling four-cup calipers with DSII pads. Master cylinders, linkage box and hoses from the 512. Additional ducting. Suspension: Rigid bushings, drilled A-frames, larger diameter anti-roll bars front and rear. Aluminum doors and lids; plexiglass windows. Chin spoilers and adjustable rear wing. Result: 2350 lbs wet. 40 gallon fuel capacity. Top speed: 176 mph.

H I S T O R Y

This car enjoys a special place among modern Ferrari racers. For one, it's one of the few Ferrari four-seaters ever converted to compete as well as one of the few factory ventures into group five production-based racing. In its initial outing at Le Mans in 1974 it retired after only four hours with clutch problems while lying 38th.

The following year it was entered by the NART team of Luigi Chinetti and qualified with a time of 4:32 placing it in the top-half of the grid but was withdrawn along with the entire NART team as the result of historic flap between the French officials, notorious for their often "unique" intrepretations of race rules and regulations, and Lugi Chinetti, usually notorious for his skillful dealings with officials.

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308 gt4 LM by former owner W.A. Schanbacher

The one-off 308 LM was one of the last GT race cars to be prepared by the Ferrari factory. Built to be a LeMans Group 5 car, it is based on a standard 308 GT (we believe that the car was built from the first production prototype). The modifications involved all aspects of the car: motor, braking, suspension, aerodynamics, and lightening.

The motor was extensively modified to long distance racing standards. Competition Daytona pistons and rods were installed; the crankshaft and cylinders were machined to increase clearances slightly. The heads were ported and polished. Valves were standard, though polished, and the exhaust valves were xrayed for hidden faults. 42mm carburetor venturis, coupled with a modest race cam and an excellent set of exhaust headers completed the power boost modifications. To maintain oil pressure during hard cornering, the oil pan baffeling was completely reworked. The result was an engine that would produce 300 hp at about 8200 rpm and could last for 24 hours. (Personally, the wonderful reliability has been one of the great delights of the car.)

To stop the car, Girling 4 cup calipers with DSII competition pads were mounted all around. The master cylinders, linkage box, and hoses were from the 512. Brake cooling ducts were installed and the results, even with stock disks, are amazing.

To help around corners, the suspension was reworked to the extent allowed by the rules. Elastic suspension bushings were replaced by rigid ones. The A-frames were extensively drilled for lightening. New anti-sway bars were installed front and rear, and the car was shod with Goodyear 8 x 15's in front and 10.5 x 15's in the rear.

Weight, the eternal enemy, was removed by the construction of new super light aluminum doors; the replacement of all glass except for the windshield with plastic; and, the fabrication of new motor and front deck lids out of light-gauge aluminum. The new result was a car that, when filled with 40 gallons of gas and all other liquid, weiged 2350 lbs.

Aerodynamics were cleaned up with a spoiler and an adjustable wing. The overall effect was esthetically very pleasing (and personally a nice improvement on the somwhat prissy appearance of the production car). During track tests, the car achieved a top speed of 283 - 286 km/hr or 176 mph.

The car was completed in June of 1974, just a few days before the LeMans race. The car, unfortunately, retired with clutch problems in the fourth hour while standing 38th.

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1975 NART TEAM ENTRY

In 1975, the car was again entered by the NART team by Mr. L. Chinetti. The drivers, Harley Cluxton and Giancarlo Gagliardi drove the car to 4:32.9 qualification, which was the top half of the grid when the politics of European racing struck. The car was withdrawn, along with the rest of the NART team, and a slower French car was put in its place.

The following is the sequence of events which led to the withdrawal of the NART Team from the 1975 LeMans Race.

On Tuesday, June 10th, all the cars were taken down to the track for technical inspection, and with minor exceptions and changes, all the cars were set for practice for qualification. Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. began the first of the two days of practice. There were two aspects of qualification: first for speed both night and day, and second for fuel consumption. In order to qualify for fuel consumption, the car had to make 10 full laps past the timing mark and obtain better tha 5.6 miles per gallon.

The first day all four of the NART Team cars attempted to qualify, both for speed and for mileage. That evening, one of the Course Officials by the mane of Pierre Allanet, whose official position it was the hudge on such things, said that three of the NART cars -- the #17 Dino, the #46 Daytona Spyder and the #99 Boxer had all qualified for both mileage and for speed, but that the #45 Daytona had not qualified because of excessive fuel consumption. The following morning, the #45 Daytona went out on the track and set som steady laps for fuel consumption and several fast laps for speed proof, and at 10:30 p.m. on Thursday evening it was reported that all the cars had completed their qualifications both at night and during the day, and all of the dirvers had qualified.

With receipt of this information, the Team Manager, Jahn Baus, directed the team to pack up, return to the garage, and get the cars prepared for the race to start at 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 14th.

At the driver's meeting on Friday, which started at 2:30 in the afternoon, the NART Team was advised for the first time that the 308 Dino was not qualified. This, despite the fact that the car had placed in the top 40% of the grid, and had beaten three-fourths of the Porsche Carreras at the track in qualification. The ruling was that because the car was in a Prototype Class, it had to qualify faster than cars in other classes. This Class ended up with 2 Gulf Mirages, 4 908 Porsches, 3 French Ligers, and a lone Lola & 380, none the least bit comparable to the Dino. However, the car was put there by Automobile Club de L'ouest although the BMW 3.0 CSLs and racing Capris, which were reasonably comparable cars, were in Group 2. How that happened I don't know, but I am sure that it would make an interesting story.

Our problems were compounded by the aritrariness by which the size of a Class was established, or even indeed that a class speed division existed; and the notivication that we were "bumped" by a slower car without explanation as to why in spite of our assurance by an Official that we were qualified. LeMans has a history of political intrigue and Mr. Chinetti challenged the ruling. He then asked for a sheet showing how our car had qualified so slowly and how the other car had qualified faster, but the Officials refused to give him any records to document the alleged bump. Further, they disavowed their own official's statement that the car had been qualiified even though he was the specific Automobile Club de L'oest official assigned to make such hudgments. We then found that the car which bumped us was being fielded by the Guy Verrier French Driving Team which had almost bumped the Porsche Team a couple years ago. The Porsche Team threatened to withdraw and Automobile Club de L'oest relented then. Seeing as the Automobile Club de L'oest had no records which would substantiate their position, and that an Official had clearly advised us that we were officially qualified and would be allowed to enter the race, they said they would take some time and reconsider the matter.

A decision was to be reached by 10:00 the following morning. At 10:00 it was going to be 11:00; and at 11:00, 12:00; and at 12:00, 1:00; and at 1:00 it would be 1:15, and at 1:15 at 1:20; and finally at about 1:30 p.m. they said that their decision was that they were not going to allow the car to run. When confronted with the fact that they had no eveidence to show that the car had not qualified, they then asked Mr. Chinetti to sign a release saying that the car did not run fast enough and that was the reason it was disqualified. Outraged, he refused.

Mr. Chinetti then pulled the two French drivers from his Team Cars and put in an Italian and an American, and went on TV explaining the foul play. Automobile Club de L'oest then said that they would cancel his insurance if he pulled the French drivers, in another power move.

Mr. Chinetti, during the playing of the Anthems just prior to the race, then pulled all four NART cars from the race.

And that's where it is. Not racing, just politics.

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Driving at Le Mans

by Sam Posey

Excerpt from "The Mudge Pond Express" by Sam Posey

Le Mans is more than a great race; it is a French national Institution. The event has survived two world wars; the organizing club was founded in 1906 and has proved more durable than the government itself. Every year in June 350,000 devotees return to Le Mans for a total experience which can be compared only to the Woodstock rock festival. The track is on the outskirts of Le Mans, a large industrial city. The race is run on public roads which are in everyday use, so that a few hours after the last Ferrari has blasted down the Mulsanne straight a French housewife will drive the same road in her old Citroen The road surface has been much improved, however, and is billiard-table smooth. Over the years the organizers have repeatedly modified the track in the interest of safety. After Levegh's horrendous crash in 1955 the entire pits and main grandstand--three tiers high and a half mile long--were rebuilt twenty feet back to allow the track to be widened at that point. A decade later, when other track-owners were complaining about the high cost of safety guardrail, the Le Mans organizers lined the entire eight-mile course with guardrail on both sides. In 1968 they installed a new turn, immediately nicknamed "Virage Ford," just before the pits in an effort to curtail the frightening lap speeds being achieved by the big Fords and Ferraris. Within two years speeds were higher than ever, and fresh safety measures have had to be taken.

The countryside through which Le Mans runs reminds me of Sharon farms and farmhouses, open pastures interspersed with dense pine forests. You never have the feeling of going round and round at Le Mans; instead it is as if you are driving in the country from one town to the next. Despite the safety improvements Le Mans is a dangerous track. Its single distinguishing feature is the three-mile-long straight, called the Mulsanne because it is the main road from the outskirts of the city to a small suburb of that name. Before you are halfway down this straight your car is doing its absolute top speed; then you just sit there at 200 mph or more. Near the end there is a difficult right swerve followed by a hump which has launched several drivers to their deaths in the surrounding treetops. Several hundred yards before the end of the straight you stand on the brakes--it takes a long time to slow a car from that speed, and while you sit there you feel oddly weightless as the world comes back into focus.

Like Sebring, Le Mans features an elaborate tech inspection procedure, which the French call "scrutineering." It says a lot about the two tracks that Sebring always held tech in a supermarket parking lot, whereas at Le Mans there is a special half-acre enclosure surrounded by high walls, with a permanent building for the inspectors, a hydraulic lift, and sophisticated scales with a digital read-out.

Scrutineering goes on for three days and each team has an appointment; failure to show up on time incurs penalties. Even for a detail as small as checking the brake lights there are five or six inspectors, all dressed in blue business suits and each carrying his own official seal with which to stamp the car's papers. Over the years, as the officials have added rule after rule, scrutineering has become so complex that eventually NART entrusted the inspection of its cars to a specialist, John Baus, whose experience in dealing with the Le Mans bureaucracy went back twenty years to the time when he performed the same function for the Cunningham team. The drivers are as fastidiously inspected as the cars. In 1970 the officials ruled that Charlie Parsons, slated to drive a NART entry, would not be allowed to race at Le Mans because of his gimpy leg. We were all outraged and I argued with them for hours, pointing out that Parsons' leg had not prevented him from winning the USRRC in 1966 or the Daytona twenty-four-hour race in 1969. But they wouldn't listen. The next day Mr. Chinetti arrived and was apprised of the situation. His response was like a thunderbolt. If Parsons could not race, then not only would he withdraw NART's whole entry but he would also have Enzo withdraw the factory Ferraris. He would bring in the surgeon general from the nearby SAC base to certify Parsons' leg, and he would then get the American ambassador out to Le Mans and create an international incident. Suddenly the officials were honored to have "Monsieur Parsons" in their race. [...] I already knew about the French officials from my disqualification in 1966 when I drove for Bizzarrini. If only I had known Mr. Chinetti then!

For 1969 NART decided to enter their venerable Ferrari 275LM--the exact car with which they had won Le Mans in 1965, and which even then was something of an antique. I was to drive along with Theodoro Zeccoli, who was Alfa Romeo's chief test driver at the time. There was no question of competing with the Ford GT40's or Porsche's array of 908's and the brand-new 917's, but this was immaterial to me: the Bizzarrini ride had whetted my appetite for Le Mans and now I was getting another chance. The race traditionally begins at four P.M. but in 1969 it was started two hours earlier so that racegoers would have an opportunity to vote in the presidential referendum the next day. On the morning of the race the customary ten-minute drive from my hotel required two hours. The entire pit area was an impossible crush of people; the crowds were so dense that the sixty cars, lined up in echelon for the start, were invisible. Bands marched by on the track. An hour before the start a long line of blue-coated gendarmes swept the whole area clear of people.

At the American races Mr. Chinetti customarily left most of the decisions to other NART personnel, but at Le Mans he was always the boss. He decided that since Zeccoli was a Le Mans veteran he should make the start: the traditional footrace across the track. The old Le Mans start went like this: The cars are lined up diagonally on one side of the track and the drivers stand in small white circles on the other side. When the Bag drops, the drivers run to their cars and you can hear their feet slapping on the pavement. Then one engine bursts into life, followed by others; a car jerks forward out of line, the others begin to move; the noise reaches a crescendo-a very exciting business, but dangerous and quite meaningless in a twenty-four-hour race. As if to make this point, in 1969 Jacky Ickx walked to his car. Others should have followed his example. On the first lap the English driver John Woolfe, who had earlier announced his intention to take it easy in his new Porsche 917 because "the car frightens me to death," crashed and was killed, a victim of the excitement of the start: in his eagerness to get underway quickly he had neglected to fasten his seat belts. Zeccoli threaded his way through the crash scene but not everyone was so fortunate, and one car was ignited by the blazing wreckage.

The early hours of the race were a sprint, with the new Porsche 917's predictably taking the lead. For a while the gaps between the front runners were measured in seconds; but gradually certain cars were delayed with minor troubles, or couldn't quite keep up, and toward dusk the character of the race had changed subtly as it always does at Le Mans. A car which seemed forever destined to be twenty seconds be hind the leader was now unaccountably three laps back. This transition was reflected by a change in the personality of the cars. In daylight each car could be recognized a mile away by its shape and color, and it was possible to distinguish between co-drivers by their helmet designs. Now the drivers were unseen, anonymous, and the cars only bursts of noise and lighted number panels in the deepening summer twilight. For a competent driver there is no essential difference between daylight and night driving, except at Sebring where the lights of the other cars point directly at you in certain parts of the course. Everywhere else, the darkness simply makes it harder to see, and your lap times may slow fractionally. Around midnight, however, you approach and pass your ordinary bedtime. The instinctive need for sleep is reinforced by your realization that it is imperative to be well-rested, but at the same time you are reluctant to miss anything, to sever your direct involvement, to lose touch. Besides, it is very hard to get to sleep. Close your eyes and you still see the road rushing at you; lie down, and the horizon begins to tilt and you become dizzy. You grasp the edge of the cot for balance. "Wake me up in twenty laps," you tell someone; time is no longer measured in hours and minutes, but in laps.

Around one A.M. it became my turn to drive again. I awoke immediately, as if I had never been asleep, except that I was shivering with the cold. Three laps before Zeccoli was scheduled to pit I began nervously to get ready. The earplugs felt chilly and unpleasant. The pullover hood reeked of clammy perspiration. As I pulled my helmet on I became aware of my own breathing, like a diver. Under the harsh glare of the pit lights the NART mechanics in their blue coveralls wearily prepared to refuel the car. Their tools were scattered everywhere, a mute contrast to the neat array of wrenches at the start of the race. I peered down the track into the darkness, careful not to blind myself by looking directly into the headlights. Our car loomed out of night, flashing its lights as it wailed past the pits: one lap to go. I tried to rehearse the procedure for getting into the car and buckling the seat belts. Then I saw one of the mechanics out in the pit lane, waving his arms, and suddenly where there had been darkness there was the red mass of the Ferrari instead, with steam rising from it. The door opened and the back of Zeccoli's driving suit forced up through the opening. Then I was getting down into the dark cockpit, reaching around behind my back to hook my arms in the shoulder harnesses. I could sense arms reaching in to help me and then I felt the belts click together. The windshield was being wiped clean and I could see the legs of the mechanics--nothing more than that because the car was so low. I found the toggle switch for the fuel pump; then they were giving me the signal to start so I threw the switch and pushed the starter. The engine noise was startling in spite of the earplugs. I drove out through all the legs, flicking on the headlights as I moved down the pit lane. Then the pit lights were gone and there was only the pool of my own lights ahead of me on the track. Into the darkness. The first rush of acceleration was calming; it spun the tumblers of my mind and reset them. Once again I was alone with the Ferrari. The cockpit was warm and sweaty. The instruments glowed. Driving in a groove which I had developed after hours behind the wheel, I guided the car with an economyof physical movement. The tense effort of the earlier hours, the pinpoint concentration, gave way to reflexive motions and intuitive thoughts. My mind contracted until all that mattered was the sensation of speed and of covering distance, Lap after lap,like an automaton. The miles spun off in an endless journey to nowhere. The lighted Ferris wheel beside the track seemed to turn as if it were geared mysteriously to the cars revolving on the track.

It is a strange psychological phenomenon of Le Mans that the thousands of miles which the drivers accumulate on the track do represent a vast journey away from the common space and time which they shared with their team at the start of the race. In the middle of the night the drivers begin to feel distant, as if rather than going in circles for hours they had actually been driving away from the starting point. At four A.M. I replaced Zeccoli again and headed down the Mulsanne in the Ferrari, slipping through small patches of fog. As I reached the point where the road kinks slightly to the right, everything--the trees, the sky--flashed pink as if millions of stage lights had just been switched on. I hit the brakes automatically and a moment later I went into a fog bank suffused with eerie pink light. It was like driving into a huge ball of cotton candy. I stopped the car. Then I realized that I could be hit from behind so I jumped out and hurdled the guardrail. Now I was in the woods. I noticed another driver wandering around as if in shock and recognized him as the German Udo Schutz. As I ran toward him the fog lifted for a moment and I saw a car burning in the middle of the track; it was the combination of flames and fog which created the pink light. I could see the course workers bravely trying to fight the fire, so I got my arm around Schutz, brought him to the guardrail, and shouted to the rescuers so they would see that he was out of the car. Then i ran back to my car and accelerated away. Just before dawn the fog worsened. Shooting down the Mulsanne, I would be confronted every lap with an impenetrable gray wall and no way to tell whether it was a little patch or a whole bank. If I slowed down and it turned out to be a harmless wisp I knew I would feel like a fool; so as long as my nerves could stand it I would roar into the fog at full speed, traveling the length of a football field every second into fog so thick that I could not see more than two car-lengths ahead.

When dawn finally came it was a shock to see the changed appearance of the surviving cars. Even those which came through the night unscathed were stone-blasted and streaked with oil. Racing along, I could smell breakfast cooking over ten thousand campfires. Shortly after lunchtime Elford's Porsche 917 broke down after leading for seventeen hours. For some time the Ford GT40 of Jacky Ickx had been dueling for second place with Hans Herrmann's Porsche 908. Now they were racing for the lead, and with ninety minutes to go they were only a fewfeet apart. I had taken the wheel for the final two hours. The track was almost empty. Near the end of the race the crowd began to gather near the guardrails. A few waved. Five laps to go. Four laps. More were waving. Past the pits. Crest the hill under the Dunlop bridge. Down into the esses. The crowd was massing behind the guardrails, waving, waving. In the signaling pits the NART people were waving a bottle of champagne. As I made my dreamlike progress around the track for the last time I felt an electric contact with the crowd. On the Mulsanne a big cargo plane flying very low slowly caught and passed me. its rear door had been removed and a television camera was pointing out with two men standing beside it. Realizing that they must be following the leader on his last lap, I looked in my mirrors and saw both Ickx and Herrman bearing down on me. As they went by, Herrmann had just pulled out to pass Ickx, and for a moment the three of us ran in line abreast. Then Herrmann completed the pass and Ickx tucked in behind him; but at the end of the straight, just before they vanished from sight, Ickx repassed. When I reached the finish line the entire area was hooded with people. I slowed to a crawl, trying to find my pit, but people were pounding the roof and sitting on the fenders. Trapped and exhausted, I was finally rescued by the NART mechanics. The crowd was going wild in the excitement of the finish. Ickx had clung to the lead I saw him take; the man who had walked to his car twenty-four hours earlier had won the race by fifty feet. Zeccoli and I had finished eighth: the highest-placed Per- Udo Schutz had survived intact--only to be killed in a race just one week later. Later that night I asked the NART people what they thought had happened when I was missing for so long when I stopped for Schutz. "Oh," said Dick Fritz, "there was one lap that seemed a bit longer than the others, but we didn't think anything of it."

The following year, 1970, was the year of the rain. When the race started at four P.M. the track was bone-dry but the the lead, and with ninety minutes to go they were only a fewfeet apart. I had taken the wheel for the final two hours. The track was almost empty. Near the end of the race the crowd began to gather near the guardrails. A few waved. Five laps to go. Four laps. More were waving. Past the pits. Crest the hill under the Dunlop bridge. Down into the esses. The crowd was massing behind the guardrails, waving, waving. In the signaling pits the NART people were waving a bottle of champagne. As I made my dreamlike progress around the track for the last time I felt an electric contact with the crowd. On the Mulsanne a big cargo plane flying very low slowly caught and passed me. its rear door had been removed and a television camera was pointing out with two men standing beside it. Realizing that they must be following the leader on his last lap, I looked in my mirrors and saw both Ickx and Herrman bearing down on me. As they went by, Herrmann had just pulled out to pass Ickx, and for a moment the three of us ran in line abreast. Then Herrmann completed the pass and Ickx tucked in behind him; but at the end of the straight, just before they vanished from sight, Ickx repassed. When I reached the finish line the entire area was hooded with people. I slowed to a crawl, trying to find my pit, but people were pounding the roof and sitting on the fenders. Trapped and exhausted, I was finally rescued by the NART mechanics. The crowd was going wild in the excitement of the finish. Ickx had clung to the lead I saw him take; the man who had walked to his car twenty-four hours earlier had won the race by fifty feet. Zeccoli and I had finished eighth: the highest-placed Per- Udo Schutz had survived intact--only to be killed in a race just one week later. Later that night I asked the NART people what they thought had happened when I was missing for so long when I stopped for Schutz. "Oh," said Dick Fritz, "there was one lap that seemed a bit longer than the others, but we didn't think anything of it."

The following year, 1970, was the year of the rain. When the race started at four P.M. the track was bone-dry but the sleep, but when I closed my eyes the rain would start comingat me again. For the first time in my career I was aware of the possibility that I might not live through the race. In any race there is always the danger that something may go wrong unexpectedly, but at Le Mans almost every moment on the track was perilous. Nevertheless there was only one thing to do, which was to continue.

Hans Herrmann, who would eventually win the race, was interviewed at dawn. "You cannot see a thing," he said."You daren't use more than third gear on the straight; you cannot brake, accelerate or decelerate; the car doesn't respond to the wheel at all." Dawn usually provides an emotional uplift which helps to offset the fatigue, but at dawn it was raining harder than ever. Each car trailed a wall of spray, so that in order to pass you had to drive into the spray completely blind, trying to guess where the other car was and knowing that you had to complete the pass before you arrived at a turn. Out of sheer exhaustion I sometimes hung back behind a slower car for nearly a lap, just out of range of his spray, summoning the courage to pass.

Sometime in the early morning Vic Elford passed me in his Porsche 917. 1 tried to follow but I couldn't make myself take the risks he was taking. Before he became a racing driver ElEord had been one of the world's top rally drivers and had plenty of experience driving in ice, snow, fog, and rain. Perhaps that gave him an advantage over me; but there was also the likelihood that Vic was just braver. That depressed me so profoundly that I forced myself to try things that seemed irrationally dangerous. An hour later Elford crashed; perhaps he had been driving too fast, I don't know. [...] By noon, with four hours to go, the track began to dry. We were running fourth, miles behind the leading Porsches. Two of the Ferrari's cylinders were out and our top speed was cut by 30 mph. There was no point in pushing hard now; we were driving deliberately, trying to avoid the easy mistake. With an hour to go Bucknum brought the car into the pits for the last time and lifted himself wearily from the cockpit. I climbed in and drove slowly back onto the nearly empty track. The crowd began to come to the guardrails to wave. The year before I had felt as if their emotions were being transmitted to me like electrical energy, but this time I felt nothing. On those last laps I had no emotion at all left in me. After winning the race Herrmann announced his retirement. He had enjoyed a long and illustrious career; in his fifteenth Le Mans he had finally won the race and given Porsche their first-ever Le Mans victory. But as he explained, "Even if I had not won, I made up my mind to chuck racing altogether. In the rain one found oneself in situations so absolutely beyond control that the risk was really too great." Only seven cars were classified as finishers. Of those which failed to finish, eleven had been put out by crashes. For the second straight year I drove the highest-placed Ferrari. In the week prior to the race I had been sharing a hotel room in downtown Le Mans with Charlie Parsons. Every morning at five A.M. We would arise, lift our suitcases onto the beds, and wait. "Long after we've forgotten whatever happens in this race," Charlie said philosophically on one occasion, "as long as we live we'll always remember sitting here, before dawn, watching the bidet overflow." I agreed with him then; most races are soon forgotten. But not Le Mans 1970.

The year 1971 proved to be by far my most successful Le Mans. Tony Adamowicz and I were third in NART's 512M and for the third consecutive year mine was the first Ferrari to finish. But the race was an anticlimax after the epic struggle of the previous year. There was, however, one high point. Our car was delayed in the opening laps, which gave me an excuse for some fast driving to make up the lost time. When I pulled into the pits to hand the car over to Adamowicz I was startled to receive a standing ovation from the crowd.

"What's happening!" I asked. - "You just broke the lap record!" someone told me. I shot a quick glance at Mr. Chinetti, who was forever ordering me to

drive slowly to save the car, but although he was trying to look stern he could not keep the smile off his face. Mr. Luigi Chinetti is a little old man. To look at him you would never guess that he has won Le Mans three times as a driver. In his third victory, except for two hours, he drove the entire race himself.....at the age of forty-nine! That was the first time a Ferrari won Le Mans; years later, when Mr. Chinetti's car won in 1965, it was the last time a Ferrari won at Le Mans. Now another of his cars had broken the lap record, and he could barely conceal his pride. Seventy-one years old and stilla racer. [...] My record was bettered later in the race by a Porsche 917, but it didn't matter. For years NART had shown that their cars could finish a race; now they had also shown that they could be fast.

Six weeks later I had another chance to show the car's speed. The day after the six-hour event at Watkins Glen there was a Can-Am race, and many of he long-distance cars were entered, including Penske's Ferrari 512M and the Gulf Porsche 917's. After an hour of racing I was trailing Donohue by a scant two reconds when his steering broke; I went on to defeat the two Gulf Porsches and finish sixth overall. By the end of 1971 NART had come a long way from that afternoon at Daytona when Dick Fritz let me drive the beige GTB to the garage. Surprisingly, they were becoming a team to be reckoned with. But just as they reached the threshold of success the rug was pulled out from under them. In 1972 the rules were changed and the magnificent 512's became useless museum pieces. The Ferrari factory introduced a new 312 which proved to be invincible. At NART we waited and hoped for the day when a 312 would be made available to us, but the day never came. In the meanwhile, as a stopgap measure we ran the Daytonas, which were better than nothing and proved well suited to Le Mans; I co-drove a Daytona to

sixth overall there in 1972. But trying to eke out a class win in a glorified street machine just wasn't the same as rushing down the Mulsanne at 230 mph.

Driving for NART had been like riding a merry-go-round while NARTs fortunes rose and fell according to Ferrari's whim. In five years I had ridden every horse and I had reached for the brass ring; but the music was fading now and

the merry-go-round was slowing to a crawl. It was time to get off.

.

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Lamberko   
Lamberko

Feel like racing?

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Maybe a standard Ferrari isn't fast enough for you. Maybe you have an extra one sitting around you would like to modify for a race car? Then you may be interested in what went into making this GT4 competition.

Start with the guts...

Making a racer out of any car is a serious committment both of time and money. The conversion of this 1975 Dino GT4 (s/n 10716) was carried out by Miles McAndrew and took over three years to complete although like any racer it's still an ongoing project. The car is mostly raced at Ferrari club events and weekend competitions but it is a fully modified race car.

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The first step was gutting everything out of the original GT4. The interior was stripped, all the glass was removed and a full roll cage installed. The glass was replaced with Lexan as was the rear engine compartment cover.The floor panels were replaced with aluminum diamond plate and the firewall at the engine compartment was removed and replaced with removeable panels giving easier access to the back side of the engine. The removeable inner rear wheel-well panels give further access. To make engine removal/installation easier some of the structural steel members surrounding it were repositioned. The doors were redesigned using 3/8" aluminum honeycomb for the frame and reinforcing ribs. The outside panel of the door was made using aluminum sheet bonded to Kevlar(facing inside), while the interior "skin" was made using aluminum sheet bonded to a Kevlar/carbon fiber material.The final result was a door that weighed a mear 7 1/2 lbs. and was extremely strong.

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The body modifications were next. Careful consideration was given to fender widths to accommodate racing wheels and tires as well as the neccessary cooling for the various systems. NACA ducts were designed into the bodywork for cooling the passenger compartment, front and rear brakes, engine oil cooler, transmission oil cooler, the oil pump, and both headers. A separate NACA duct with "scoop" was cut into roof just above rear window to "feed" the engine induction system. After the design of the body style, "bucks" were made inorder to build molds for final construction of the body panels. Then we took an air chisel and cut 90% of the steel body panels off the car and replaced them with the newly fabricated panels. These new panels were "hand laid" fiberglass/Kevlar construction. The exterior was several layers of fiberglass for ease of sanding/painting, the interior surface was Kevlar for strength & toughness. The rocker panels were then lightened using the same construction method as the doors. The entire front hood is removeable for access to radiator, master cylinder, brake/clutch pedals, windshield wipers, front suspension, battery etc. In order to improve stability at speed an adjustable rear wing (actually 2-small & 1- larger, independently adjustable) was installed the rear. The airfoil properties were selected based on min. drag yet yielding max. downforce in the extreme position. The bottom structural member of the front radiator air intake (grill) is an inverted airfoil for greater downforce on the front suspension. If the rear tailights don't look stock there's a good reason: their from a school bus.

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A new dash was installed using a full compliment of AUTOMETER gages. The guages measure such critical factors as RPMs. amps, fuel pressure, engine oil pressure, transmission oil pressure, engine oil temperature, transmission oil temperature, and of course water temperature. A Haylon fire suppression system was installed behind the drivers seat. There are 2- seats made by OMP of Kevlar/carbon fiber construction each with Simpson 5-point safety harness. Tire changes are made easier with the 4- pneumatic air jacks that were installed, 2-behind the front wheels & 2-behind the rear wheels.

Dry weight now is approx. 2300 lbs.

The Engine

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The 3 litre Ferrari V8 is a powerful engine but it is built more for the road than for the track. Miles wanted to get the maximum power as well as improve reliability for the grueling demands racing would put on the powerplant. The major modifications included the following:

1) Heads were reworked & flowed.

2) New competition cams were installed (don't remember the profiles).

3) New Manley valves were installed

4) New Weisko(sp.?) pistons & connecting rods were installed.

5) An external Aviad dry sump pump was installed.

6) A 16- quart oil reservoir was installed in the same location as the original passenger-side fuel tank which was eliminated.

7) The oil pan was modified with 2- pick-up points.

8 ) A new, larger oil cooler replaced the stock unit.

9) A transmission oil cooler & electric oil pump was installed.

10) The oil filter was relocated.

11) A new mechanical fuel injection system was designed and installed. This didn't work out very well. I believe that the crank shaft driven mechanical fuel pump was the problem since it was not self- priming. Heat was a major problem creating vapor lock. Right now I'm going back to the original Weber Carbs. Modified to feed the increase in compression ratio (12.7 to 1). Eventually (when money permits) I'll go bact to an electronic fuel injection system.

12) The dual distributors were replaced with 1- Mallory magneto for added punch. I had driven the car with both systems (mech. fuel inject. & unmodified carbs. It performed much better even with the unmodified carbs. I'm looking forward to running it with the modified carbs. A decent electronic fuel injection system would probably cost around $5000 (US). I will no doubt have to change the ignition system to something like an electronic "crank trigger" instead of distributors or magneto.

13) An ATL fuel cell was installed in about the same position as the original driver's side fuel tank.

14) A NASCAR aluminum radiator was installed.

Suspension

The shocks (dampers) are Koni,double adjustable, aluminum, gas and rather expensive ($1800 for 4) not installed. The spring rates were changed for a stiffer ride more suitable to the track. The anti-sway (roll) bars were increased in diameter and the resilient bushings were changed to solid bushings. The sway-bars, both front & rear are adjustable. Original Ferrari upper/lower "A" arms, front & rear were retained. Stock brakes, disks, calipers, brake pedal & master cylinder were replaced with NASCAR racing brakes for added stopping power. The brake bias (front/rear) is adjustable from the dashboard. These brakes while having great stopping power are relatively inexpensive.They cost about $400 per corner for the disk assembly and 4-piston calipers. Brake pads aren't expensive and are a snap to change. The wheels are 3-piece aluminum and 16"x 10" wide on the front and 16"X12" wide on the rear. The rubber that hits the road on this car is in the form of racing slicks or rain tires depending on conditions. A supplier here in the states sells used slicks pretty inexpensively that have given good results. Miles only uses the car at Ferrari Club events and doesn't race the car professionally.

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The Checkered Flag

Miles tells me that he has since swapped the mechanical injection for the original Webers with improved performance even though the carbs are noted for starving during cornering. He's looking at replacing the ignition system and of course there's more on his list. You may not understand the committment of time and money but the number of those who get to race a Ferrari is few in this world and to own a racer would be one step up.

You may think that you would only do this to a car that had been in a wreck or needed some major fixing but here that is not the case. In fact, the car he started with was in great shape and had even appeared in some advertising. Take a look for yourself.

Wondering what kind of car his son drives? A GT4, of course! Like father like son!

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Lamberko   
Lamberko

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The Ferrari 308 GT4 is the least expensive way to get into the Ferrari experience.

Production Numbers

Year....308 GT4....208 GT4

1974.......76...........41

1975......598.........468

1976......439.........193

1977......320..........84

1978......267..........24

1979......326..........47

1980......112..........23

Performance

Max. speed......154

0-30................2.5

0-40................3.6

0-50................5.4

0-60................6.9

0-70................9.1

0-80...............11.4

0-90...............15.2

0-100.............18.1

0-110.............22.4

0-120.............30.3

mpg city............12

mpg hwy............19

The Affordable Ferrari

Though it has been around since 1974 the Ferrari 308 GT4 seems to have found its place in the world of Ferraris. Recent magazine articles have featured the car as one of the best driving V8 Ferraris and an automotive bargain that can be had for less than the price of a new Honda Accord. Ferrari enthusiasts who at one time looked down on its lack of a V12 and its Bertone styled body now appreciate the car for what it is - a great driving Ferrari that you can enjoy every day.

The 308 GT4 came at a time that Ferrari was reinventing itself. It was still adjusting to the marriage with Fiat that had shifted the production of road cars so as to leave Enzo Ferrari more time and resources to devote to his passion for racing. The first child of this marriage had been the Dino 206 and later the 246 which could supply production based numbers for a competitive Formula Two engine. The 246, though not officially badged as a Ferrari, was well received and quickly earned a place in enthusiast's hearts as the "baby Ferrari." It had a sibling from Fiat as well in the Fiat Dino coupe styled by Bertone and a spyder styled by Pinin Farina. It was from this tangled relationship of Fiat/Ferrari that the design contract went to the pens of Bertone.

Humble Beginnings

The car debuted at the Paris auto show in 1973 and began production in 1974. It was badged as a Dino, a status unchanged until floundering sales led Maranello to replace the Dino labels with the prancing horse. Traditional star-patterned five spoke wheels replaced the Dino wheels and boxer trim was added to many of the cars residing on dealers lots. The car got great reviews on its driving but there were many who disliked the angular styling especially in the long shadow of the popular 246.

Acceptance

After more than 20 years much of this hardly seems in issue. V8s in Ferraris are an accepted fact. Even though the GT4 remains the only major Ferrari designed by Bertone (the other being a 250 SWB GT) its looks are more accepted as such cars as the Lotus Esprit, the Maserati Bora and Merak, the Fiat X/19 came forth all echoing the lines of the V8 Ferrari. The Dino 308 GT4 actually has something on many of the cars that have succeeded it. With its four Weber carburetors hissing a throaty song, its dual distributors and coils providing the spark, and the wonderful workings of all of its mechanical parts the GT4 harks back to the end of an era before fuel injection, troubling electrics and the omnipresent computers that rule the world of automobiles today. The 308 GT4 is today what so many people said it never was - a true Ferrari.

The Heart

The 308 GT4, like any Ferrari, shares in the legacy of the finest sporting traditions in the world. Its motor, a 3 liter double overhead cam, is directly descended from the Formula One motor that propelled John Surtees to a World Championship in 1964. Driven by separate cam belts and fed by four Weber carburetors the motor produces 240 horsepower at 6600 rpm in its US trim. It is, in fact, this powerplant that really sets this Dino apart from its predecessor. On paper the V6-powered 246 is very close in performance figures to the 308 and betters it in some areas. Owners who have experienced both models, however, remark that going from the 246 to the 308 is akin to stepping into a Corvette. The eight cylinder powered car produces its power at a more useable range making everyday driving a more enthralling experience. The motor produces a sound unique among other sports cars. While the Cobra and its big block cousins shake the ground with their low rumble the Ferrari fills the air with a melodic song unlike anything else.

Suspension

The suspension is standard Ferrari and largely a holdover from the 246. It is a tube frame, though in this case the tubes happen to be square. Each corner is supported by double wishbones with Koni shocks surrounded by coil springs. Vented disk brakes provide the stopping power with ducts to funnel cool air to the front. Steering is rack and pinion and though it lacks power assist it is light and precise, improving with speed. The wheelbase is a tad over 100 inches, about eight inches longer than its cousins the 246 and the 308 GTB/GTS.

The Inside Story

A striking difference between this car and its shorter stablemates is the level of comfort within. Granted, this Ferrari is no luxo-tourer like the 400A or the 456. Compare it to the GTB or the 246 and you can begin to appreciate what a few inches can mean. The GT4 is 3.5 inches taller with a wide-opening door making ingress/egress a much simpler task. With the extra space behind the front seats the car feels roomier as well. The driving position is typical Italian elbows and knees out with the wheel well forcing your feet to the middle. There's a nice dead pedal and the brake and throttle are well suited to heel and toe driving. Ferrari aficionados will appreciate the fact that Enzo himself determined the arrangement for the interior. Marcello Gandini, chief stylist for Nuccio Bertone, remembered it this way, "Because Ferrari was against a longer wheelbase that comfortably housed four seats, we prepared a mockup with pedals, four seats and an engine. This mockup could be made longer or shorter using a hydraulic pump so Ferrari himself could decide on the pedal's position and the interior space, thus obtaining a wheelbase as short as possible."

Get Back

This left little room for the back seats and there is much discussion as to whether the second 2 shouldn't be more like 2 x .65 or something of that nature. In practice the rear seats are well suited to children making the car a wonderful Family Ferrari. Even larger people can ride in the back providing the front seat passengers cooperate some and the trip is not too long. Even my 6 foot, 190 pound frame fits back there but requires a legs-open position to accommodate the front seatback which then resides inches from your face. Once, while giving a ride to a friend and his son I had a chance to test the limits. I can attest to the fact that it is possible for a 6'2" 210 pounds person to ride shotgun with a skinny six-footer behind for a short trip though care should be taken through turns as it tends to bottom the already low suspension. Don't make the mistake of being rash and discounting the practicality of the back two seats - without them there would be many times that you could not drive the Ferrari and would have to rely on some other four-seater. Besides, for me there are only two types of driving: 1) when I am driving the Ferrari and 2) when I wish I was driving the Ferrari.

Value and Practicality

People react very differently to the car. There are those, especially little boys and older men, who show excited enthusiasm and will point and jump at the sight of a Ferrari. Other people look upon it as the ultimate extravagance. It's possible that co-workers who seemed so nice no longer talk to you and while they'll look at a friends new pickup they won't step near your new Ferrari. Women usually don't look at all.

Most people think of Ferraris as tremendously expensive but many people spend the same amount of money on lesser cars. A new Honda, Toyota, or Nissan can cost as much or more than a good GT4 but when you figure the cost of depreciation things narrow out quite a bit. GT4s sold new for about $27,000 more than 20 years ago and now go for a few thousand less than that. A new SUV will cost more than that and will lose $10,000 in 10 years at least. Now, of course you shouldn't buy a Ferrari as an economy measure but there are few things that give as much joy fetching a gallon or two of milk than a Ferrari.

Parting is Such... work

Naturally, if owning a Ferrari were such a simple and practical task there would be one parked in every neighborhood. The fact is, however, that ownership requires its own mindset. It is after all an Italian car, a mechanized piece of sculpture designed for rapid transit regardless of cost. Italian mechanics are not necessarily known for being trouble free. Parts can be expensive although those owners with initiative will find that many parts cross-over to less expensive Fiat or Alfa parts. Door handles are reportedly the same as X1/9 ones, radiator fan switches are the same thread as Fiat and Alfas, and although the Ferrari thermostat is unique my Ferrari runs cool with a Robert Shaw brand that my dad had bought for his GMC motorhome. Finding parts that fit often involves a few calls to different folks but you soon learn to remove a part and carry it to a Schucks or Pep Boys and ask if they have one. Invariably they will ask, "Is that off a Toyota?" to which I shyly respond, "No, it's off a Ferrari but a Toyota part may fit."

Final Words

So that's about it. They are great cars but they have a way at keeping you busy. There is a bright side to older exotic cars like this one. Even though they are complicated machinery carefully engineered to deliver great handling and speed they are remarkably simple by today's standards. There are no computers measureing airflow or temperature. Though hard to adjust, the four carburetors are not complicated. There are no grease fittings underneath so changing the oil is just 13 quarts of your favorite stuff and the oil filter is right on top and easy to get to. Doing any work underneath means elevating the car (unless you can slide under less than 5 inches of clearance) but then it's pretty straight ahead stuff. If you are on the interenet there is a lot of help out there in the Ferrari listserver and the Ferrari Club of America offers regional get-togethers, newsletters, track days and more.

Bottom line? If you've ever dreamed of owning a Ferrari stop dreaming and start working towards that goal. After all, you only go around life once and if you go faster you can cover more ground.

This late model...

...featured a sun roof and a four-point harness that was attached quite cleverly to a bar that ran across the back and was connected to the normal attachment points.

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Another difference I noted was that the later cars had orange or red lettering on the gearshift knob as opposed to the white found on earlier years.

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:-))!

.

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DavidDriver   
DavidDriver
1975er US-308GT4 - s/n 10314

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That is my car!

Sorry, I don't speak German, so I can't read anything here! LOL!!! :P

But I am on http://www.ferrarichat.com, where there is a fill history on the vehicle and a description of the work I am doing to fix a 3rd gear syncro that has been bad since the first owner sold the car in the late 1970's.

Here are some current pictures:

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F40org CO   
F40org

Hello David,

welcome on board of the German-Ferrari-Web-basic.

Nice car. A coming classic Ferrari with traditional combination.

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streumaus   
streumaus

Na, erkennt ihn jemand? Das ist der GT4, der vor 2 Jahren bei der Lebenshilfe Gießen verlost wurde.

Und ich hab ihn gewonnen!!! :) :) :)

Ist von Michael Schumacher signiert.

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streumaus   
streumaus

Noch schöner war es an dem Tag, als ich zum ersten Mal mit dem Kleinen Roten bei meinem Chor vorgefahren bin. Unsere Farben sind halt rot-schwarz, und dann meinte ein Mitsänger, ob sie jetzt alle auf der Motorhaube unterschreiben sollten, da hätte ja eh schon einer drauf rumgekritzelt... :-o

Wir sind übrigens ca 100 leute im Chor... :???:

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F40org CO   
F40org
Wir sind übrigens ca 100 leute im Chor... :???:
....das heißt Du bist mindestens schon 100 Runden (denn hinten wollte bestimmt niemand sitzen) um den Proberaum gefahren, oder? :wink:

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me308 VIP CO   
me308

70er Jahre, Werksfoto

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F40org CO   
F40org

Interessant!!! Fast kein roter Dino GT.

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cinquevalvole CO   
cinquevalvole

Aufschnitt: :-o

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LittlePorker-Fan VIP   
LittlePorker-Fan

Dieser Stand vor knapp 7 Jahren in meiner Gegend zum Verkauf.

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Dinofisti CO   
Dinofisti

Hallo aus dem Norden!

ich hatte mal gelesen, dass der GT4-Entwurf auf dem des Ur-Urraco basierte, bzw. der im Hause Bertone beauftragte Designer Gandini z.B. die Rückleuchten 1:1 von einem früheren Urraco Prototypen übernahm, als der GT4 noch garnicht gezeichnet wurde..... es gibt auch ein Bild von dem Lambo.... daher vermute ich, dass der schöne 308 GT4 Entwurf bei Ferrari "recycelt" und neu interpretiert wurde... die Quelle kann ich Dir gerne bei Interesse nennen.

Grüße, Tobias

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helmut2   
helmut2

Auf Wunsch stell ich nun ein paar Bilder meines GT4 rein.

Grüsse

Helmut2

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Fiatx CO   
Fiatx

Im Letzten Jahr waren wir zu Gast

bei der großen Dame Lilli Bertone.

Wir hatten die Ehre, alle Bertone Schöpfungen zu bewundern.

Diese war natürlich auch dabei:

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JoeFerrari   
JoeFerrari

Update für diesen älteren Thread

Wie ich finde passen auch zu diesem Ferri durchaus Grau- und Blautöne.

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Vielleicht aber auch Rosso Vinaccia (?)

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Quelle: Siehe Fotos

P.S. Der Dino vom King kommt dieses Jahr als 1/18 Modell (Vorserienmuster!)

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dinogt4 CO   
dinogt4

nach 2 jähriger Restauration :)

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Ultimatum CO   
Ultimatum

wow, ist der schön geworden, gratulation auch zu dieser eleganten farbe!

:-))!:-))!:-))!

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Ultimatum CO   
Ultimatum

kürzlich beim youngtimer festival is spa in der nachbarbox:

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dinogt4 CO   
dinogt4

Ja, ich find auch, dass ihm die Farbe gut steht :-))!

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    • AVB
      Mir gehen die Fragen nicht aus...
      Mich würde interessieren wie die Tankentlüftung beim Euro 308QV geregelt ist. Das jetzige durcheinander bei meinem US QV gefällt mir nicht und ist mit Sicherheit unnötig,da inzwischen durch das Entfernen fast aller regelnden Bauteile für die Abgasentgiftung diese sowieso nicht mehr funktioniert wie sie soll.
      Wie läuft das also bei der deutschen oder italienischen Ausführung? Schweiz nehm ich jetzt mal aus, da ist bestimmt wieder alles anders...
      Für Info's bin ich wie immer sehr dankbar,
       
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    • F40org
      Ich unternehme mal den Versuch eines Corvette C3-Bilderbuches. Ist ja mittlerweile ein Klassiker geworden und wenn man versucht hier nicht irgendwelche abartigen Umbauten zu posten, sondern nur schöne Bilder von schönen Autos, dann müsste es funktionieren. Wie üblich mit wenig Wort und ohne Signatur.
    • Moses Blackhero
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    • AVB
      Hallo zusammen, wiedermal ne Frage:
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