taunus

McLaren F1 vs. Ferrari F50

33 Beiträge in diesem Thema

Zitat
McLaren F1 and Ferrari F50

People have at various times claimed each is the last-word supercar, but they're too different to shuffle into an order. Which wins, McLaren or Ferrari? Which smells stronger - music or arithmetic? A pointless enquiry, as tediously misdirected as the Blur v Oasis niggling we endured a couple of years ago. But that doesn't mean they aren't fascinating to compare.

Sure, the F1 and F50 have a lot in common. Both are designed to be complete driver's cars - faster, lairier, purer than your run-of-the-mill Testarossas and Diablos. In many ways they make less of a statement than traditional supercars; a Diablo owner gets a lot of satisfaction from driving a car that's very large, very loud and utterly bonkers-looking. The MacLaren, especially, is absolutely not about being bonkers: it was shaped by the need to be usefully compact, easy to see out of, and aerodynamically clever. Both the F1 and F50 express their purity partly by doing without various 'driver aids' that might come between you and them: anti-lock brakes, traction control, power steering. No luxuries, either, especially in the Ferrari whose windows you wind down yourself to save weight.

Both of these cars start on a button, not a key. Makes firing up feel more special for the owners - so special they can't keep it to themselves. Several of them have been happy to let us have a go. The only proviso is we can't take pictures of the two together (which is one of the reasons we've used a racing McLaren for the photos, the other being that it looks so trouser-wobblingly striking). Neither Ferrari nor McLaren likes comparison tests, and they've made it clear to owners that they won't be pleased if the cars are lent to CAR for that purpose. And when the factories do all the servicing, it's very much in the owners' interests not to cross them.

So what are those starter buttons connected to? The turbo has been given the cold shoulder in both engines; it contaminates the pure response, you see. So both McLaren and Ferrari settled on big, bold, mad, bad, high-tech V12s, six-speed gearboxes, carbonfibre monocoque tubs, and race-style double wishbones with the horizontal spring/damper units. In both, the rear suspensions bolt to the transmissions, which feed the weight back through the engine blocks to the bulkheads. Just like Formula One cars. Famously, the Ferrari motor is derived (though only loosely) from the early-'90s GP V12, as used by one Alain Prost. Despite their light-and-simple philosophies, both have air-con. A luxury? Hardly. Without it you'd simply barbecue in the heat soaking off these ferocious engines.

 

Zitat
Wrapping all that, both cars are shot through with drop-dead obsessional details, exotic component choices and orbitally high pieces of on cost. It all adds up to cars that, though preposterously expensive, do represent some sort of meaningful value equation. Look around them for long enough and you can discern the material destination of every one of these hundreds of thousands of pounds sterling. The McLaren is the more flawless jewel. It's not only that many bits are almost unimaginably precious, but that every part seems flawless. But then, to be mundane, it does cost twice as much.

Think for a minute that the Ferrari's pedals have exquisite cast and machined aluminium pads allen-bolted to their stems. But then look at the McLaren's: the F1's accelerator is a fabrication of six ultra-light titanium components. Of course, there are such no-compromise absolutes all over these cars: naked carbonfibre around their cabins and engine bays not for decoration but because that's the flesh and bones of them and because it's the most appropriate stuff for the job. Ball-jointed linkages for throttles and suspensions alike. Telemetry systems that allow the respective factories to interrogate a car that breaks down, wherever it is in the world. On the McLaren's BMW V12, a set of exhaust headers that cost more to make than an entire engine in a V12 BMW 7-series. On the Ferrari, a race-style fuel cell that has to be replaced every 10 years at a cost of £12,000.

Approaching the F50-F1 pairing, the differences between the two come tumbling in. The F50's carbonfibre, Kevlar and Nomex outer skin was designed by Pininfarina and is clearly part of the Ferrari lineage, but beautiful it isn't. The shape is all about downforce, about cross-wind stability, getting cold air in, getting hot air out. There are some lovely bits, though: at the nose, the Ferrari badge sits between the radiator outlet tracts on a dart-shaped hump echoing a grand prix car's nosecone. At the back, if the sunlight's in the right direction, the engine, gearbox and suspension are lit from above through the Perspex cover, and when you drive behind the F50 you can see them clearly through the mesh between the tail-lights.

 

Zitat
The McLaren's shape is like no other supercar before. Gordon Murray laid out the brief, and Peter Stevens designed the shape to fit. It's lean and spare, a thing of rare and subtle beauty. The aerodynamics played a part in the shape, but cleverly, it's hidden. Look how clean are the nose and tail sections, how free of obvious spoilers: the McLaren is sucked to the road rather than pressed onto it. The shape also had to fit three people in echelon formation, to mould space for their baggage in the side panniers below the outer pair's seats, to have that dorsal air-intake, and it had to shrink-wrap over the mechanicals. Most important, it had to be compact - vital, that, to make it as usable as possible on real roads. But also, a smaller car has lower frontal area and it's lighter. Weight: another obsession of the McLaren designers, hence the use of exotic materials even for ordinary components and the famously lightweight custom CD hi-fi. The F50, butt-bare though it might appear, weighs eight percent more. A Diablo, by the way, is all but 40 percent heavier.

To get into the Ferrari, you pull on an apparently feeble plastic catch. No point in worrying about locking it, for if someone wanted to get in they'd climb in over the top. No-one, by the way, uses an F50 with its hardtop on: the racket from the bolted-in engine is intolerable when you're in a confined space with it. The F50 door opens conventionally, and then it's the usual supercar method of taking the long bum-first fall into the seat then swinging your legs the energetic arc over the sills. If you think that's a bit short on dignity, check out the breathless gymnastics needed to get behind the McLaren wheel. It's never going to be easy getting first into the car's left-hand side and then over the carbonfibre rail that fences off the central footwell.

In the F50, your seat is a relatively simple but deeply-contoured affair with flying-buttress side bolsters and tall walls either side of your thighs. Its cradle is lightweight carbonfibre, but of course the McLaren's is lighter, thinner again.

If the Ferrari's cabin has an aesthetic, it's a functional one. The carbonfibre weave is beautifully aligned, glinting out from behind a liquid-gloss resin. On top of the dash, it's black Alcantara to dampen reflections; the binnacle is simple, the vents plain humble. On the carbon tub's floor, no carpet, but fitted industrial-type dimpled rubber mats. What more could you want? The instruments are blue-lit jobs that show up only when the ignition's on, like in a Lexus. The speedo, which runs to a metric 225mph, and 10,000rpm rev-counter are huge dials, the best bar-graphs. In sunlight, they're too dim to read easily. The driving position is low, and there's a lot of car either side of you. But you can see out clearly because the screen pillars are thin and set a long way back - the wraparound effect partly designed to prevent the air that gusts out of the radiators from broiling your face.

 

Zitat
Carpet and more leather mean the McLaren's inside is a little more opulently clothed, but not a lot. There are more controls, though: electric windows, completely integrated hi-fi and so on. Stalks are from a BMW, which means they look and feel like quality items. It's the quality of everything in here that overwhelms almost as much as the odd seating position. The instrument faces have laboratory-finely-calibrated markings. The control knobs have precision-engineered actions and clear, simple markings, a sense of being very important. They look like the control panels you saw on your school trip around a nuclear power station.

It isn't especially odd, sitting so far forward and centrally, nor getting used to the division of controls: handbrake in the left-hand rail along with the hi-fi knobs, gearlever on your right with the heating and air-con. But when there are passengers, it feels a bit rum finding their disembodied voices coming from behind obliquely, like parrots on your shoulders.

Right, lets press those buttons. It turns our they breathe life into a pair of remarkably different engines. The Ferrari's isn't as hard-nosed as the race engine it stems from, thanks to the substitution of chains for gears in the cam drive, and iron for alloy in the block. Twin-path induction and exhaust systems plump out the torque curve, too. At idle, it's smooth, loud V12 musical, and in concert with Ferrari's lightest-ever gear change, it's an easy car to get gently rolling. Around 2000rpm, a rattly mechanical clatter cuts in, just like a restrained racer, but you can rid yourself of that by revving some more. If you've been gasping at the 520bhp headline figure, however, you might be given pause when you have your first full-throttle moment. The F50, you see, won't seem that fast. Not if you're using, say, 'only' 4500rpm. But never forget the F50, titanium rods and five-valve heads and all, will run to 8500.

Use all those revs and suddenly the F50 becomes absurdly fast, viciously fast, and altogether wonderfully fast. The torque is a self-fulfilling prophecy, multiplying as the engine's scream gets higher. It's always a loud engine, but when it's flinging itself forward in the highest quarters, it really does sound like a hard-edged race V12. When it's going about that sort of business, you have to be quick on the draw with the gearlever: almost as soon as you've hooked up a slot and pressed the throttle, you'll be homing in on the red line and preparing to grab the next of the close-stacked six gears.

 

Zitat
As if the McLaren's giant 6.1-litre swept volume weren't enough to guarantee monster torque, BMW's double-VANOS (variation of inlet and exhaust cam timing) helps too. This makes the F1 most drastic gatherer of speed in history. No need to change down, no need to check the tacho (or your ears) for proximity to the powerband. It's not a powerband, it's a power prairie, broad and fertile and unfathomable. Mind you, it does get stronger higher up too. Your limit's at 7500, and the work it does on the way there is enough to give a convincing impression of unlimited high-speed acceleration in the way that even an F50 can't match.

Yet the F1's is a remarkably refined engine too. Cruising, it hums into the background. But to floor the throttle is to wind the Marshall-amps to 11. When that noise comes it isn't uncultured: it's just vast and irresistible and Wagnerian. Mr Ferrari's Boxer/Testarossa flat-12, the roadgoing sonic benchmark these past two decades, is second-division now.

The McLaren has so much urge underfoot, so much of the time, that you never flex your right foot without thinking very carefully about the consequences. The Ferrari is less brutally rapid unless you've with malice aforethought arranged to be in a big-rev gear. This makes a difference when you're accelerating out of a corner.

Because they generate colossal grip and cost a hill of money, you know that if you do get it wrong on either of these cars the crash will be very fast and financially problematic. That's intimidating. And yet, the Ferrari is not in itself an intimidating car to push hard through corners. It's all about feel, this car, feel and control. The steering isn't darty, but it's deliciously precise. Load the F50 up and its scoots around a bend, stable and supernaturally free of roll. And agile like no other Ferrari, even the 'little' ones. The front track's wider than the rear, which promotes stabilising understeer. Not a lot, but enough to build your confidence. But what makes the F50 so joyous is the ease with which it'll throttle-balance. You really can, given the right tarmac - a tight track, or an upland A-road with 60mph corners and uncluttered visibility - drive it like a giant kart.

The McLaren, given its savage torque, is a piece of cake to unseat at the back, too, and again it's set up to understeer a little at first, so you can neutralise it as you feel ready. The steering is heavier that the Ferrari's, higher-geared and especially weighty as you use lock on corners and build speed. Like an early 205GTI's, really. But it also tells you more that the F50's, so when you're on the go it's easy to forgive. The F1 rolls a little more that the F50, but its grip feels more impregnable more of the time. Unless you use that right pedal, in which case you're going to have to be very fast to catch it, so racing drivers tell us. On that same A-road, we'll be staying inside the McLaren's downforce-multiplied limits. It's the Ferrari that invites you to play with it more because, aside from its steering, it tells you more about what's a-happening, and it happens more progressively.

The (non-ABS) brakes on both cars are just fabulous, eye-poppingly strong but so 'connected' that if the surface gets dusty or damp you just feather the pressure a little to regain grip. And because they're so precise, you're barely conscious of doing it.

The McLaren's suspension is more civilised. Yes, it's firm. Both cars are firm, as thy have to be to have such damping control when they're flying. But the McLaren's front suspension is mounted on special subframes that pivot in carefully controlled dimensions. When the front wheel hits a small bump, the wheel mass is allowed to move backwards, to cushion the shock, but the tyre patch doesn't move, so the steering stays precise. The Ferrari has none of that: solid spherical joints are used throughout the suspension, but even that doesn't make it too harsh. Long wishbones exert lots of damper travel, so the usual stiction is less of a problem. Whatever, both cars have a decent ride.

But the Ferrari runs low to the road and scrapes its underbelly at times, and it makes a lot of tyre racket. It's not a car for poor surfaces, or for cruising. Loud, hot and tiring. You can't park it because you can't lock it, and it has no music. Inasmuch as you'd ever feel comfortable about leaving such a capital asset in a public place, it is possible to park and lock an F1, and it has more ground clearance, and it'll go up the motorway comfortably to the racetrack you've hired or the upland roads you're intent on demolishing. There's tyre noise, but otherwise it's amazingly civilised. It carries luggage too, which the Ferrari can't, and an extra passenger - yet it's the smaller car.

The McLaren is very different from any supercar before: no longer can anyone claim to build the 'ultimate' just by adding more power, more size, more visual drama. The F1 is about brains even more than it's about that astonishing 6.1 litres of brawn. It's the more original car if this pair as well as the more fanatically constructed. And that engine is a towering achievement, unquestionably the greatest road engine ever. The whole vehicle is so awesome, you'd take years to get to the heart of it. Maybe it would never happen. Now does that sound to you like the ultimate challenge, or an unending frustration? The answer to that question, of course, lies not in the McLaren F1 but in your own character.

The Ferrari is very different, more raw, maybe more of a toy, and if not as fast all-out the difference is surely not enough to be decisive. But it's a more understandable car, and some of the time for some people that makes it the more joyous driving experience. But that can't make it the winner. There is no winner here, because it would be daft event to entertain the possibility of there being a loser.

Quelle: www.carmagazine.co.uk

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich hab mir nicht alles durchgelesen, aber immer wenn an den McLaren denke, muss ich auch daran denken wie Ayrton Senna mal erzählte das der der McLaren ab Tempo 240 schneller beschleunigt als sein Formel 1 Rennwagen. Das hat mich damals schwer beeindruckt und somit ist der McLaren F1 bis heute noch der ultimative Rennwagen für die Strasse. Der F50 kann da meiner Meinung nach nicht mithalten.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Das hat mich damals schwer beeindruckt und somit ist der McLaren F1 bis heute noch der ultimative Rennwagen für die Strasse. Der F50 kann da meiner Meinung nach nicht mithalten.

Das kann ich unterschreiben.

Ich finde es umso beeindruckender wenn ich überlege, dass der F1 nun doch schon knapp 10 Jahre alt ist.

Gab es seitdem ein vergleichbares Auto? Ich wüsste keines.

Der Vergleich stammt übrigens aus der "autowelt" (1/97). Müsste das Heft noch rumliegen haben.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

der McLaren ist schon einzigartig, allein der sitzposition wegen. von den fahrleistungen könnte da wenn überhaupt noch ein Königsegg oder Enzo drankommen.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

..kann ich nur Zustimmen, ist und bleibt ein Topsport(renn)wagen. Wenn damals dieses Auto unter einem anderem Namen und mit mehr Platz (Innenraum) gekommen wäre würde heute es bestimmt eine Nachfolger Variante gäben. Schade eigentlich. Potenziall ist unglaublich!!

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ein toller Artikel.

Der F50 ist ein oftmals unterschätzter echter "Rennsportwagen". Hier wurde tatsächlich das Konzept von der Rennstrecke auf die Straße umgesetzt.

Der Mclaren F1 ist schlichtweg ein ingenieurtechnischer Geniestreich und als letzter puristischer Supersportwagen auch in Zukunft unantastbar.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Der Traum am McLaren sind Design, Geschichte sowie der Motor...Quasi ein doppelter M3 3.0...Einzeldrossel...Kenwood hat damals extra leicht Hifi-Komponenten für den McLaren gefertigt...irre.

In der EVO war auch mal so ein Vergleich, ich meine jedoch gegen den Carrera GT...Such mal, wenn ich zu Hause bin!

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Der Mclaren F1 ist schlichtweg ein ingenieurtechnischer Geniestreich und als letzter puristischer Supersportwagen auch in Zukunft unantastbar.

Na ja. Es ist kein Geheimnis, dass der McLaren F1 bei hohen Geschwindigkeiten über Gebühr leicht wird, in schnell durchfahrenen Kurven treibt es selbst erfahrenen Piloten den Schweiß auf die Stirn. Von Downforce kann dem Vernehmen nach keine Rede sein.

Wenn man bedenkt, was für erfahrene Piloten (abgesehen von Rowan Atkins a.k.a. "Mr. Bean") mit dem Wagen schon in die Botanik geflogen sind, stellt man die ersten Überlegungen an... Und wer Bernd Hahnes Fahrbericht aus der auto welt noch in den Ohren hat... Ich zitiere mich einfach mal aus einem ganz alten Thread:

Nicht ganz.

Du erinnerst Dich an unsere Diskussion zum Thema Enzo vs. F1:

http://www.carpassion.com/de/forum/viewtopic.php?p=182454&highlight=hahne#182454

Ich zitiere mich:

Bin ich ebenso Deiner Meinung. Bernd Hahne attestierte dem F1 im Vergleich zum F50 seinerzeit ein recht tückisches Fahrverhalten, es war von derben Lastwechselreaktionen und einer recht ausgeprägten Instabilität um die Längsachse die Rede. Bernd Hahne vermutete zu geringe Downforce...

Und soweit ich mich erinnere monierte Derek Bell (?) das gleich bei seinem 250-mph-run in Ehra Lessien...

Und was die Topspeed angeht sind meiner Meinung nach bisher nur Prototypen über 370 km(h gelaufen, die meisten machen bei 350 km/h zu.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Danke Karl, Du hast grad den Mythos McLaren F1 in mir zerstört.

Nein, im Ernst - das hab ich bisher nicht gewusst und ich hatte mich damals schon gewundert wo der Pitschedsrieder den F1 am Chiemsee geschrottet hatte.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Danke Karl, Du hast grad den Mythos McLaren F1 in mir zerstört.

Nichts für ungut, ich hab' dasselbe vor ein paar Jahren durchgemacht, als ich mir eben jener Tatsachen bewusst wurde :wink: .

Das ist zwar der einzige "Fehler", den der ansonsten perfekte Wagen hat, aber es schränkt die Nutzung eines Verkaufsargumentes doch erheblich ein. Wobei - wie Autopista einst richtig feststellte - Tempi über 350 nie einfach zu fahren sind... - wenn man sie denn erreicht 8) ...

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Hammer

Geschwindikeit mph (km/h) Sekunden

70 (112,63) 3,9

80 (128,72) 4,5

90 (144,81) 5,6

100 (160,9) 6,3

110 (176,99) 7,2

120 (193,08 ) 9,2

130 (209,17) 10,4

140 (225,26) 11,2

150 (241,35) 12,8

160 (257,44) 14,6

170 (273,53) 17,2

180 (289,62) 20,3

190 (305,71) 23,8

200 (321,8 ) 28,0

:-))!

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Toller Vergleich können wir als Otto-Normal-Verbaucher ja gut nachvollziehen! :???::-))!

Und wieder ein Fzg. das wir uns ja alle leisten können und da macht eine Diskussion ja richtig viel Sinn!

Na Na!Gibt viel Sehr Gute andere Foren!Finde CP gut aber nicht soooo gut!

@Feldjäger: Kann es sein, dass Du im falschen Forum bist :???:

@all: Wenn ich mir den F1 anschaue, dann muss ich sagen, dass der SLR ein Frechheit ist und McLaren wieder mit einer gscheiden Firma Autos bauen sollte :wink:

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Na ja. Es ist kein Geheimnis, dass der McLaren F1 bei hohen Geschwindigkeiten über Gebühr leicht wird, in schnell durchfahrenen Kurven treibt es selbst erfahrenen Piloten den Schweiß auf die Stirn. Von Downforce kann dem Vernehmen nach keine Rede sein.

Der Mclaren F1 hat konzeptbedingt 3 Problemstellen:

- Die sehr kompakten Ausmaße erschweren die Gestaltung einer Form mit entprechendem Abtrieb. Da der F1 relativ kurz ist, fällt die Karosserie hinter der Fahrgastzelle nicht genügend ab. Dieses Problem wurde bei den Rennversionen und beim GT behoben. Beide sind bedeutend länger.

- Der F1 ist auf einen niedrigen cw Wert optimiert wodurch entsprechende Spoiler oder Finnen nicht zum Einsatz kommen. Es gestaltet sich daher sehr schwierig nur mittels eines flachen Unterbodens und entsprechender Ventilatoren Abtrieb zu erzeugen, eben weil der Unterboden auch nicht sonderlich lang ist.

- Der kurze Radstand verstärkt den Effekt dynamischer Radlastverteilung und führt zu erhöhten Lastwechselreaktionen, insbesondere auch auf Grund des sehr hohen Leistungsgewichts.

Gordon Murray waren diese Problemstellen bekannt, aber er kehrte von seiner kompromisslosen Ausrichtung nicht ab. Den F1 länger zu machen, hätte auch mehr Gewicht bedeutet. Ein Spoiler wie beim F50 hätte den cw Wert erhöht und die V/max reduziert. Man hat versucht dem Wagen eine recht untersteuernde Ausrichtung zu geben um Schlimmeres zu verhindern. Aber über 600PS auf gut 1200kg sind eben niemals einfach zu bändigen. Sehr viele Fahrer sind einfach an den schlicht infernalischen Fahrleistungen des Wagen gescheitert.

Grundsätzlich hat der F1 aerodynamisch keine Mängel. Ganz im Gegenteil. Der Wagen liegt stabil (Was auch viele Testfahrer bestätigen) nur sind die entsprechenden Kurvengeschwindigkeiten eben nicht sehr hoch. Im Gegensatz zum F50 ist der F1 natürlich viel giftiger. Ersterer ist länger,erzeugt mehr Abtrieb, schwerer und hat viel weniger Drehmoment. Aber er erreicht bei weitem nicht die Fahrleistungen. Ein serienmässiger F1 erreicht 368km/h (jene Geschwindigkeit die auch im Brief steht) und das auch nur weil der Wagen dann im 6ten im Begrenzer fährt. Der Rekord-Prototyp hatte vermutlich auf Grund seines hohen km-Standes einen recht gut laufenden Motor und natürlich ein höheres Drehzahllimit, aber das wars dann auch.

Der F1 steht für mich an der Spitze der Supersportwagen, weil er nicht nur einfach der Schnellste war, sondern weil er eben auch ein kompromissloses Fahrerauto ist, welches in Sachen Ingenieursarbeit, Materialverwendung und -verarbeitung bis heute keine Vergleiche zu scheuen braucht.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Der F1 steht für mich an der Spitze der Supersportwagen, weil er nicht nur einfach der Schnellste war, sondern weil er eben auch ein kompromissloses Fahrerauto ist, welches in Sachen Ingenieursarbeit, Materialverwendung und -verarbeitung bis heute keine Vergleiche zu scheuen braucht.

Sehe ich auch so. Hier passten Anspruch und Ausführung zusammen. Es wurde Kompromisslosigkeit geplant, es wurde Kompromisslosigkeit gemacht. Ohne Rücksicht auf Verluste. Und das unter einem weltbekannten Label.

Und dass das nicht so einfach ist führt uns dieser Tage ein milliardenschwerer Weltkonzern vor, der einen der ebenfalls schillernsten Namen der Automobil-Geschichte wiederzubeleben trachtet. Aber zum Glück konzentriert man sich in Wolfsburg demnächst wieder auf kleine Autos...

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Der Bugatti Veyron wird uns vielleicht offiziell mit den schnellsten Fahrleistungen im Serienbau beglücken, aber unter Experten wird er trotzdem niemals den Status des F1 erreichen können.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ein Sportwagen, der extrem schnell geradeaus ist, aber in den Kurven im Vergleich langsam, ist für mich kein Supersportwagen sondern eher ein Spezialist.

Schnell geradeaus fahren ist für mich die langweiligste Form des sportlichen Fahrens. Zumal der F1 - wie es heißt - selbst das nicht perfekt kann.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Ein Sportwagen, der extrem schnell geradeaus ist, aber in den Kurven im Vergleich langsam, ist für mich kein Supersportwagen sondern eher ein Spezialist.

Schnell geradeaus fahren ist für mich die langweiligste Form des sportlichen Fahrens. Zumal der F1 - wie es heißt - selbst das nicht perfekt kann.

Aerodynamik und Fahrwerksabstimmung sind immer eine Gratwanderung. Der Mclaren F1 erreicht keine sonderlich hohen Geschwindigkeiten in schnellen Kurven. Grundsätzlich sollte man sein Potential als Kurvenjäger aber nicht unterschätzen. Immerhin ist der Wagen enorm leicht und bzgl. Gewichtsverteilung mit dem Fahrer in der Mitte optimal. Wie Mr.Atkinson in seinem Bericht in der EVO schrieb, ist der Wagen im Grenzbereich im Vergleich zum Carrera GT recht einfach zu fahren. Das war auch das erste Ziel der Entwickler um Gordon Murray. Das Potential des Wagens unterstreicht die sehr erfolgreiche Rennsportkarriere.

Was die Geradeausfahrt angeht so beherrscht der F1 diese Disziplin perfekt. Hierzu ein Zitat von Andy Wallace aus dem oben geposteten Link von amc:

"Vor der eigentlichen Fahrt dachte ich, dass ich es auf 360 km/h bringen würde, was ich bereits früher geschafft habe. Dann aber müsste das Fahrzeug meiner Meinung nach instabil werden, was mich an schnelleren Geschwindigkeiten hindern würde. Es war aber überhaupt nicht so. Ich bin erstaunt wie stabil das Auto bei 386 km/h lag."

Ich denke, daß sehr viele Fahrer einfach nicht mit der überwältigenden Kraft des F1 fertig wurden. Bei so einem Auto kann man praktisch nie in der Kurve kräftig aufs Gas gehen, weil es auf einmal Kurven gibt, die man vorher gar nicht wahrgenommen hat. Auserdem gibt es keine Traktionskontrolle, kein ABS, keine Servounterstützung. Kann mir nicht vorstellen, daß es einem in dem Wagen jemals langweilig wird.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Ich habe irgendwo im Web ein Bild von einem blauen F1 mit O. Manthey auf der NS (Linkskurve vor dem Schwalbenschwanz?) am Steuer gesehen. Mannomann der F1 hatte eine ganz schöne Seitenneigung. Mehr als bei einem 360 CS. Vielleicht ist der F1 deshalb einfacher in den Kurven zu fahren, als der Carrera GT, weil er ein ganzes Stück langsamer ist.

Vielleicht ist der F1 doch mehr Mythos, als was anderes.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Es reicht, wenn man sich mal den Top Gear Bericht mit Tiff ansieht. Bei jeder Bremsung geht das Teil in die Knie, und in jeder Kurve überschlägt er sich gleich. :-o

Trotzdem ist der McLaren F1 technisch das wohl kompromissloseste (Ich weiß ich weiß, scheiß wort) :wink: was ich kenne.

Und die Tatsache, dass so ein altes Auto mit dem Enzo mithalten kann und diesen sogar teilweise überbietet. Macht das Auto für mich umso mehr faszinierend. :hug:

:wink2:

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Ich habe irgendwo im Web ein Bild von einem blauen F1 mit O. Manthey auf der NS (Linkskurve vor dem Schwalbenschwanz?) am Steuer gesehen. Mannomann der F1 hatte eine ganz schöne Seitenneigung. Mehr als bei einem 360 CS. Vielleicht ist der F1 deshalb einfacher in den Kurven zu fahren, als der Carrera GT, weil er ein ganzes Stück langsamer ist.

Vielleicht ist der F1 doch mehr Mythos, als was anderes.

Klickt euch da mal durch

www.fotos.web.de/marcweber76 => IMG_1697_1.JPG

Kann jemand vielleicht ein paar Sätze zum F1 LM (Straßenversion) verlieren, Daten, Unterschiede ?

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Ich habe irgendwo im Web ein Bild von einem blauen F1 mit O. Manthey auf der NS (Linkskurve vor dem Schwalbenschwanz?) am Steuer gesehen. Mannomann der F1 hatte eine ganz schöne Seitenneigung. Mehr als bei einem 360 CS. Vielleicht ist der F1 deshalb einfacher in den Kurven zu fahren, als der Carrera GT, weil er ein ganzes Stück langsamer ist.

Vielleicht ist der F1 doch mehr Mythos, als was anderes.

Denke schon, daß der F1 ein Mythos ist. Immerhin war er auch der erste Seriensportwagen mit einem Chassis komplett aus Carbon.

Was die Radaufhängung angeht, so entschloß man sich bei Mclaren damals nicht für eine Pushrod Aufhängung mit horizontalen Feder/Dämpfereinheiten, weil man davon ausging, daß ein solches Setup nicht genügend Federweg bereitstellen könne um bei sehr hohen Geschwindigkeiten Bodenunebenheiten zu verkraften. Deshalb hat der Mclaren eine vergleichsweise hohe Seitenneigung. Wobei man hier auch die zeitgenössische Betrachtungsweise nicht aus den Augen verlieren darf. Vor 12 Jahren gab es vielleicht höchstens den F50 der dem F1 in Sachen Handling deutlich überlegen war. Heute hätte der Mclaren mit Sicherheit auf der Rennstrecke auch gegen einen Enzo nicht den Hauch einer Chance. Aber wer bitte könnte so etwas erwarten?

Es ist auch keinesfalls so, daß Mclaren einfach eine 08/15 Radaufhängung drangebaut hat. Auch in diesem Bereich ging man neue Wege. Mehr zum dem Thema hier:

http://www.audiosignal.co.uk/Resources/McLarenF1.pdf

Der F1 LM unterscheidet sich in vielen Teilen vom Serien-F1. Die Aerodynamik ist mehr auf Abtrieb getrimmt, der Motor leistet ohne Kats 680PS, auserdem sind alle Komfortextras nicht mehr enthalten. Das Trockengewicht des straßenzugelassenen Wagens beträgt 1062kg,aber die Höchstgeschwindigkeit liegt bei "nur" 355 km/h.

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen
Vor 12 Jahren gab es vielleicht höchstens den F50 der dem F1 in Sachen Handling deutlich überlegen war.

Was ist denn mit dem Porsche 959?

Diesen Beitrag teilen


Link zum Beitrag
Auf anderen Seiten teilen

Erstelle ein Benutzerkonto oder melde dich an

Du musst ein Benutzerkonto haben, um einen Kommentar verfassen zu können

Benutzerkonto erstellen

Erstelle ganz leicht ein neues kostenloses Benutzerkonto.


Neues Benutzerkonto erstellen

Anmelden

Du bist bereits Mitglied? Melde dich hier an.


Jetzt anmelden